February

Handling challenging situations in the classroom
Presented by Moji Shahvali and Wideline Seraphin
Tuesday, 2/6/2018, Noon - 1:15 p.m.
315 Rider Building, University Park

Moji Shahvali (portrait)Wideline Seraphin (portrait)It's not a question of if, but rather of when—challenging situations happen to all teachers, whether that means chronically late students, distracting use of mobile devices, hostile students, or some other behavior.

This workshop, facilitated by Wideline Seraphin & Moji Shahvali, will focus on ways to deal with challenging situations without becoming part of the disruption.

This workshop satisfies a requirement for the Instructional Foundations Series for new instructors.

Wait List for Spring 2018 Course in College Teaching Wednesday 2/7/18 - 4/4/18
Facilitated by Chas Brua and Edmund Hansen
Wednesday, 2/7/2018 to Wednesday, 4/4/2018, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
315 Rider Building, University Park
chas Brua (portrait)Edmund Hansen (portrait)

This highly successful 8-week course, facilitated by instructional consultants Chas Brua and Edmund Hansen, combines the best elements of a collaborative learning environment with those of a seminar on pedagogy. Discussion of the current literature on teaching and learning, as well as facilitation by instructors from the Schreyer Institute’s experienced faculty, help prepare participants to design and implement both practical and reflective instructional activities.

The Course in College Teaching is a free, non-credit course. In Spring 2018, it is open to any graduate student or post doc  with prior teaching experience or teaching assistantship. Interested faculty are invited to participate, as well.  The application deadline has passed. To apply for the wait list, please fill out this form: http://tinyurl.com/spring2018CCT

Applicants accepted into the class will be notified by e-mail prior to the start of the course.

Get Students to Focus on Learning Instead of Grades: Metacognition is Key!
Presented by Saundra McGuire
Monday, 2/12/2018, Noon - 1:15 p.m.
Online via Zoom - link TBA

Saundra McGuire (portrait)Twenty-first Century students come to college with widely varying academic skills, approaches to learning, and motivation levels. Faculty often lament that students are focused on achieving high grades, but are not willing to invest much time or effort in learning.

This session will focus on the importance of helping students acquire simple, but effective learning strategies based on cognitive science principles. Participants will engage in interactive reflection activities that will allow them to experience strategies that significantly improve learning while transforming student attitudes about the meaning of learning.

Get Students to Focus on Learning Instead of Grades: Metacognition is Key!
Presented by Saundra McGuire
Monday, 2/12/2018, 2:15 - 3:30 p.m.
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Saundra McGuire (portrait)Twenty-first Century students come to college with widely varying academic skills, approaches to learning, and motivation levels. Faculty often lament that students are focused on achieving high grades, but are not willing to invest much time or effort in learning.

This session will focus on the importance of helping students acquire simple, but effective learning strategies based on cognitive science principles. Participants will engage in interactive reflection activities that will allow them to experience strategies that significantly improve learning while transforming student attitudes about the meaning of learning.

Teaching so all your students are included
Facilitated by Chas Brua and Wideline Seraphin
Tuesday, 2/20/2018, Noon - 1:15 p.m.
315 Rider Building, University Park

chas Brua (portrait)Wideline Seraphin (portrait)Students and instructors all bring unique personal histories to the classroom. One of our responsibilities as teachers is to make sure that our classes are places where all students—regardless of their backgrounds or identities— feel welcome to learn.

In this workshop, facilitated by Chas Brua and Wideline Seraphin, we'll talk about practical strategies for teaching inclusively.

This workshop satisfies a requirement for the Instructional Foundations Series for new instructors.

Teaching inclusively
Friday, 2/23/2018,
This is a closed presentation customized for the requesting department. If you are interested in a similar workshop for your area, contact us at site@psu.edu.
Feeling like a fake: Overcoming the impostor phenomenon
Facilitated by Michael Murphy and Moji Shahvali
Tuesday, 2/27/2018, Noon - 1:15 p.m.
315 Rider Building, University Park

micheal murphy portraitMoji Shahvali (portrait)Impostor Phenomenon (also sometimes called Impostor Syndrome) is the belief, despite evidence to the contrary, that one is inadequate, unworthy, and does not belong in a particular role or position. One attributes one's success to luck, luck that will soon run out. "I am a fraud," that little voice inside says, "and it's only a matter of time before everyone else knows it. I don't belong here."

This set of beliefs and the attendant self-criticism can have profound consequences for our well-being, our enjoyment of life, work, and school, and our ability to perform at our true levels.

Impostor Phenomenon is quite common in academia, and both teachers and students suffer in secret. In this workshop, facilitated by Michael Murphy and Moji Shahvali, we will talk more about what I.P. is and how to recover a well-deserved sense of confidence, enjoyment, and satisfaction in our teaching, learning, and research. We will also explore ways to support those students in our classrooms with similar thoughts and feelings.

This workshop satisfies a requirement for the Instructional Foundations Series for new instructors.