Future Events

Implications of Flipping
Facilitated by Deena Levy and Cheryl Tkacs
Wednesday, 3/1/2017, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Via Zoom Meeting ID: 355309990

Deena Levy (portrait)This workshop will discuss potential issues encountered in a flipped classroom environment and offer teaching strategies, including discussion of lesson design, activities, and methodology. There will be time dedicated to discussion of personal experiences, and there is also a pre-session assignment to be completed prior to participation.

Before we meet, please:

 1. Watch this short (5 min.) video to familiarize yourself with relevant terminology.

2. Review the flipped lesson planning template and identify one lesson or activity (a flippable moment) in your course or a course that you are working on that you could easily adapt to this template.

3. Please have this template in hard copy for our meeting.

Zoom room:  https://psu.zoom.us/j/355309990

When entering the Zoom meeting room please use your full name or PSU user id so we can make sure you get credit for attending.

Building Connections Series: Using Real-World Examples in Class
Presented by Moji Shahvali, and Meredith Doran (EPPIC)
Thursday, 3/2/2017, Noon - 1:15 p.m.
373 Willard Building, University Park
Moji Shahvali (portrait)Students love examples! However it is not easy to bring in examples that work sometimes! In this workshop, you will practice connecting with students by using real-world examples to explain academic concepts to students. The workshop, led by Moji Shahvali, Schreyer Institute Graduate consultant and Meredith Doran, English for Professional Purposes Intercultural Center, will present strategies for selecting and illustrating relevant examples in various fields of study, and ways to address possible intercultural misunderstandings. 
Implications of Flipping
Facilitated by Deena Levy and Cheryl Tkacs
Thursday, 3/2/2017, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Via Zoom Meeting ID: 355309990
Deena Levy (portrait)

This workshop will discuss potential issues encountered in a flipped classroom environment and offer teaching strategies, including discussion of lesson design, activities, and methodology. There will be time dedicated to discussion of personal experiences, and there is also a pre-session assignment to be completed prior to participation.

Before we meet, please:

 1. Watch this short (5 min.) video to familiarize yourself with relevant terminology.

2. Review the flipped lesson planning template and identify one lesson or activity (a flippable moment) in your course or a course that you are working on that you could easily adapt to this template.

3. Please have this template in hard copy for our meeting.


When entering the Zoom meeting room please use your full name or PSU user id so we can make sure you get credit for attending.

The Summer Squeeze: Planning Effective Learning Experiences for Students in a Short Semester
Facilitated by David Favre and Moji Shahvali
Tuesday, 3/14/2017, Noon - 1:15 p.m.
315 Rider Building, University Park

David Favre (portrait)Moji Shahvali (portrait)Trying to slim your 15-week course into just 6 weeks? We can help! This workshop, presented by our Graduate Consultants David Favre and Moji Shahvalioffers strategies and best practices for effective teaching and learning over an abbreviated summer semester.

 

Making Multiple Choice Tests More Effective
Presented by Linda Suskie
Monday, 3/20/2017, 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
315 Rider Building, University Park

Linda Suskie PortraitMultiple choice tests can have a place in many courses. If they’re well designed, they can yield useful information on student achievement of many important course objectives, including some thinking skills. And item analysis of the results can shed light on how well the questions are working as well as what students have learned. This workshop, presented by Linda Suskie, will consist of presentations with short breakout exercises and opportunities for questions. Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to use principles of good question construction to develop tests, develop test questions that assess thinking skills as well as conceptual understanding, and use item analysis to understand and improve both test questions and student learning. 

Linda will present a repeat session (minus breakouts) via Zoom on Tuesday, Apr. 25, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. This session will be recorded.

How to Write a Teaching Philosophy Statement
Facilitated by Chas Brua
Tuesday, 3/21/2017, Noon - 1:15 p.m.
315 Rider Building, University Park
chas Brua (portrait)

A teaching philosophy statement is required by many search committees as part of the faculty hiring process. In this hands-on workshop, facilitated by Research Associate Chas Brua, participants will identify their central beliefs about teaching and will consider kinds of evidence they can use to show those beliefs in action. 

This workshop satisfies a requirement for the Instructional Foundations Series for new instructors.

 

How to Write a Teaching Philosophy Statement
Facilitated by Chas Brua
Wednesday, 3/22/2017, 10:15 - 11:30 a.m.
7A Sparks Building, University Park
chas Brua (portrait)

A teaching philosophy statement is required by many search committees as part of the faculty hiring process. In this hands-on workshop, facilitated by Research Associate Chas Brua, participants will identify their central beliefs about teaching and will consider kinds of evidence they can use to show those beliefs in action. 

This workshop satisfies a requirement for the Instructional Foundations Series for new instructors.

Instructional Foundations Series Reflection
Presented by Larkin Hood and Deena Levy
Tuesday, 3/28/2017, 11:00 a.m. - Noon
315 Rider Building, University Park

Larkin Hood (portrait)Deena Levy (portrait)Required event for participants in the Instructional Foundations Series. Participants will reflect on beliefs and practices about teaching and learning in light of participation in other workshops, personal teaching experiences, and classroom observations. 

Self-Directed Learning
Facilitated by Cindy Decker Raynak
Tuesday, 4/4/2017, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Via Zoom Meeting ID: 355309990
cindy raynak (portrait)

What is self-directed learning and how do we help students honestly evaluate their performance and become better learners? Students must learn to address all the aspects of the work they are asked to do, and evaluate and self-monitor their progress. In this workshop we will discuss strategies that will help students develop better metacognitive skills.

Via Zoom meeting ID: 355309990

Be advised: you will be asked to download an application to access the meeting.

To start Zoom:

1. Go to https://psu.zoom.us

2. Click Join Meeting and enter the meeting code: 355309990
3. If you do not have the software installed before trying to join or start a meeting on the Zoom website, the site will prompt you to download the software.  You do not need an admin account to install this program on your computer.
Self-Directed Learning
Facilitated by Cindy Decker Raynak
Wednesday, 4/5/2017, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Via Zoom Meeting ID: 355309990
cindy raynak (portrait)

What is self-directed learning and how do we help students honestly evaluate their performance and become better learners? Students must learn to address all the aspects of the work they are asked to do, and evaluate and self-monitor their progress. In this workshop we will discuss strategies that will help students develop better metacognitive skills.

Via Zoom meeting ID: 355309990

Be advised: you will be asked to download an application to access the meeting.

To start Zoom:

1. Go to https://psu.zoom.us

2. Click Join Meeting and enter the meeting code: 355309990
3. If you do not have the software installed before trying to join or start a meeting on the Zoom website, the site will prompt you to download the software.  You do not need an admin account to install this program on your computer.
Making Multiple Choice Tests More Effective
Presented by Linda Suskie
Tuesday, 4/25/2017, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.
Via Zoom
Linda Suskie PortraitMultiple choice tests can have a place in many courses. If they’re well designed, they can yield useful information on student achievement of many important course objectives, including some thinking skills. And item analysis of the results can shed light on how well the questions are working as well as what students have learned. This workshop, presented by Linda Suskie, will consist of presentations and opportunities for questions. Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to use principles of good question construction to develop tests, develop test questions that assess thinking skills as well as conceptual understanding, and use item analysis to understand and improve both test questions and student learning. This session will be recorded.