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This document describes the process of question sampling (item banking).

This document suggests a variety of testing models and explains why each is effective. They are alternatives or supplements to the "mid-term and a final" model.

This IDEA paper from the Kansas State IDEA Center Resources provides guidelines for creating effective multiple choice tests.

This IDEA paper from the Kansas State IDEA Center Resources provides many strategies for improving essay tests.

This test blueprint template can be downloaded and manipulated to help instructors effectively map exam questions to learning objectives, topics, modules, or themes.

This one-page tip sheet guides instructors through evidence-based components of an effective lesson plan.

A weblog tutorial for instructors and test writers interested in gaining a better understanding of how to use item (or test question) analysis. Item analysis provides useful information about how well test items ‘performed.’

This document describes each step in the program assessment or learning outcomes assessment process beginning with developing goals and ending with developing a plan for ongoing assessment. Included are instructions for how to develop learning goals and learning objectives as well as how to check for alignment between courses and learning objectives. Additional steps include choosing evidence to assess learning objectives and interpreting the results of the assessment.

This file is used by scanning operations to match questions on different test forms.

This sample score report is generated by our paper exam scanning system. The score report is an important tool that will help you evaluate the effectiveness of a test and of the individual questions that comprise it. The evaluation process, called item analysis, can improve future test and item construction. The analysis provides valuable information that helps instructors determine which are the “best” test questions to secure and continue to use on future course assessments; which items need review and potential revision before a next administration, and which are the poorest items which should be eliminated from scoring on the current administration.

This page introduces the Schreyer Institute's four self-paced modules which address important teaching and learning topics. Topics include learning outcomes assessment (program assessment), item analysis (a method to analyze the effectiveness of multiple choice tests, working with teams, and best practices for Powerpoint. Instructors can access these modules on their own time at their own pace.

We use this handout in our inclusive teaching workshop. It is adapted from “Managing Hot Moments in the Classroom” by Lee Warren at Harvard's Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. It includes suggestions about how to manage difficult conversations by planning before the course as well ideas for what to do during the course ("in the moment").

These PowerPoint slides accompanied a presentation by Linda Suskie delivered via Zoom on Tuesday, Apr. 25, 2017. Multiple-choice tests can have a place in many courses. If they’re well designed, they can yield useful information on student achievement of many important course objectives, including some thinking skills. An item analysis of the results can shed light on how well the questions are working as well as what students have learned. Viewers will be able to use principles of good question construction to develop tests, develop test questions that assess thinking skills as well as conceptual understanding, and use item analysis to understand and improve both test questions and student learning. Be sure to open the handouts file listed below as you view the presentation!

These handouts (minus quizzes for test security) accompanied a presentation by Linda Suskie delivered via Zoom on Tuesday, Apr. 25, 2017. Multiple-choice tests can have a place in many courses. If they’re well designed, they can yield useful information on student achievement of many important course objectives, including some thinking skills. An item analysis of the results can shed light on how well the questions are working as well as what students have learned. Viewers will be able to use principles of good question construction to develop tests, develop test questions that assess thinking skills as well as conceptual understanding, and use item analysis to understand and improve both test questions and student learning.

This is a diagnostic survey for undergraduate, non-science majors taking their first astronomy course. It was developed by the multi-institutional Collaboration for Astronomy Education Research (CAER) including, among many others, Jeff Adams, Rebecca Lindell Adrian, Christine Brick, Gina Brissenden, Grace Deming , Beth Hufnagel , Tim Slater, and Michael Zeilik. The first 21 questions are the content portion of the test, while the final 12 questions collect demographic information.

The Dynamics Concept Inventory is a multiple-choice exam with 29 questions. It covers 11 concept areas in rigid body dynamics and several more in particle dynamics. This is one of many concept tests designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts.

Concept inventories or tests are designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts. This link goes to a University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group. It provides information about how to access a variety of concept inventories including mathematical modeling, understanding graphs, vector evaluation, Force Concept Inventory, Mechanics Baseline Test, and several other physics concepts.

This is one of many concept tests designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts. This particular concept test is designed for students who have learned about linear signals and systems.

The iStudy tutorials are designed to advance students' knowledge and skills in areas that can promote overall academic achievement, such as studying, communicating, and career planning. Faculty can use the tutorials to help students adjust to college curricula and expectations or add career planning tools to syllabi.

Concise and useful guide for instructors designing writing assignments for their students. Focus is on four areas of planning: 1) purpose of the assignment, 2) audience the students will be writing for, 3) strategic/logistical issues, and 4) evaluating the students' work.

This website provides extensive advice on responding effectively to students' writing. The advice is structured into phases related to 1) pre-assignment planning and communication with students, 2) grading and commenting, and 3) post-assignment strategies for helping students improve their writing. Includes hyperlinks to numerous additional resources.

For use in course design or revision, this Course Outline assists you aligning course topics with course learning objectives, finding and filling gaps in that alignment, and planning how much class time is necessary for students to achieve the learning objectives. The outline is particularly useful in developing shared learning goals for multiple course sections, integrated courses, and linked courses, as well as for submissions for curricular review and assessment planning.

For use in course design or revision, this Course Outline assists you aligning course topics with course learning objectives, finding and filling gaps in that alignment, and planning how much class time is necessary for students to achieve the learning objectives. The outline is particularly useful in developing shared learning goals for multiple course sections, integrated courses, and linked courses, as well as for submissions for curricular review and assessment planning.

Based on backward design principles, this Course Assessment Plan helps you to align course learning objectives with the formative and summative assessment tools and with the instructional activities that enable students to demonstrate their learning. The document is particularly useful in preparing for course design, course revision, and assessment planning, as well as for curricular and/or accreditation review.

Based on backward design principles, this Course Assessment Plan helps you to align course learning objectives with the formative and summative assessment tools and with the instructional activities that enable students to demonstrate their learning. The document is particularly useful in preparing for course design, course revision, and assessment planning, as well as for curricular and/or accreditation review.

Team Science Toolkit is an interactive website to help support, conduct, and study team-based research. Interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, or cross-disciplinary research is becoming more and more important to scientific breakthroughs and progress. But doing this kind of work can be challenging because of different disciplinary values, cultures, and communications and researchers are typically trained within a single discipline. This is a great resource for researchers or faculty planning research projects that include multiple disciplines, facing challenges, or needing ideas. Despite being housed in the National Cancer Institute, it is relevant for researchers from a wide variety of disciplines.

Heavily abridged version of Weinstein, Y., Madan, C. R., & Smith, M. A. (in press). Teaching the science of learning. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, prepared for and presented at "Reframing Testing as a Learning Experience: Three Strategies for Use in the Classroom and at Home" on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017.

Six key learning strategies from research in cognitive psychology can be applied to education: spaced practice, interleaving, elaborative interrogation, concrete examples, dual coding, and retrieval practice. However, a recent report (Pomerance, Greenberg, & Walsh, 2016) found that few teacher-training textbooks cover these principles; current study-skills courses also lack coverage of these important learning strategies. Students are therefore missing out on mastering techniques they could use on their own to learn effectively. This handout contains the six key learning strategies to address those concerns.

Faculty and student resources useful for new faculty and their students. Faculty resources include links to Schreyer Institute, new instructor orientation, Canvas LMS, LionPATH (student information system), faculty handbook, testing, teaching and learning with technology, student ratings (student evaluations, course evaluations),

This flyer lists a variety of services provided by our consultants divided into 5 broad categories: Course Design & Planning, Teaching Strategies, Testing & Grading, Reearch on Teaching & Learning, and Course Evaluation.

Adobe Connect of the Learning Outcomes Assessment program from January 30, 2012. Includes descriptions of assessment plans in psychology, biology and Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures.

This article, from Stanford's teaching and learning center, addresses strategies for improving assessment and grading practices in the classroom.

This document provides an example of a test blueprint, which can be used to help guide test development and ensure that the test questions appropriately reflect the learning objectives of the unit that the test is designed to assess. It can also help students when they study for the test.

This file contains a list of "item-writing rules," which will help you to write multiple choice questions in a way that will improve the ability of the test to focus on the content and prevent students from guessing the correct answer without knowing the material. The rules were developed by experts in the field of psychometrics, like the people who write questions for SATs or GREs.

This is a worksheet that includes the reasons why students might be misbehaving in large classes and strategies for addressing the incivility.

This article "The Agony and the Equity," produced by the Center for Teaching at Stanford University in 1992, addresses issues associated with fair testing and grading.

This document is the master Learning Outcomes Assessment plan for the College of Information Science and Technology.

A handout that provides information and exercises on how to plan an effective class session.

In-depth discussion of planning and writing a case study. Key steps discussed include identifying the reason for using a case study; drafting the case; and piloting and revising it.

This document, excerpted from the Penn State Teacher II, includes strategies for planning, implementing, and grading collaborative projects (aka team work or group work). It includes a discussion of group conflicts.

IST's 2010 master assessment plan is a great model for similar programs trying to map their objectives, courses, and assessments.

Form for weighting items for exams with items that have different weights. Used for scanning multiple choice tests that use bubble sheets.

Case study: A teaching assistant discovers that many of the class activities she planned will be physically impossible for one of her students.

This FAQ sheet provides a number of strategies related to class and course planning and lecturing in large classes.

This is a true and false quiz to test assumptions about student ratings.

This document is an example of a test blueprint (written for a research methods course), which can be created to help you match your test questions with your learning objectives *and* to help your students study for a test.

This activity involves students pairing up to answer questions about course content and can be used for review of material before a test, for example, or for practice.