Tools and Resources

Top Downloaded Tools and Resources at Penn State

This document was created to provide you with a source of options for gathering data on teamwork assignments and projects. You may choose to adopt one of the examples as is, combine elements from several of the examples, or use the examples to identify characteristics that correspond to particular aspects of your assigned work, course content, or student population.

Lists of examples of verbs that can be used to construct specific, measurable learning objectives at each level of Bloom's taxonomy. Action verbs for writing learning objectives (or learning outcomes) for a course, program, or activity.

This document describes a specific strategy that provides a collaborative learning experience for students.

This checklist includes a list of items that Penn State requires be included in all syllabi, per Faculty Senate Policy 43-00 Syllabus. It also includes links to example syllabus statements and lists items that the Schreyer Institute recommends be included in every syllabus.

In-depth discussion of planning and writing a case study. Key steps discussed include identifying the reason for using a case study; drafting the case; and piloting and revising it.

A handout that provides information and exercises on how to plan an effective class session.

An easy to use graphical representation of updated Bloom's Taxonomy congitive domain, including definitions.

What the Best College Teachers Do
Ken Bain, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA (2004)
The publication, What the Best College Teachers Do, is based on a fifteen-year study of nearly one hundred college teachers from various fields and universities. Author Ken Bain tries to “capture the collective scholarship of some of the best teachers in the United States, to record not just what they think, but most of all, to begin to conceptualize their practices.” In this book, you will find insights on how to engage and challenge students

This is a peer-reviewed article published in the journal of Studies in Educational Evaluation. Its focus is the accurate interpretation of student ratings data (including Penn State's SRTE) and appropriate use of the data to evaluate faculty. It includes recommendations for use and interpretation based on more than 80 years of student ratings research. Most colleges and universities use student ratings data to guide personnel decisions so it is critical that administrators and faculty evaluators have access to the cumulative knowledge about student ratings based on multiple studies, rather than single studies that have not been replicated, studies based on non-representative populations, or that are from a single discipline.

The article provides an overview of common views and misconceptions about student ratings, followed by clarification of what student ratings are and are not. It also includes two sets of guidelines for administrators and faculty serving on review committees.

Brief explanation of several easy-to-use Classroom Assessment Techniques, with examples.

This FAQ sheet addresses many issues related to attendance in large classes.

Penn State Teacher II -- compendium of teaching tips and advice from seasoned faculty and graduate students.

This worksheet can be used to help instructors develop classroom activities that align learning objectives with assessments and course activities.

This file describes the characteristics of adult learners and strategies for instructors who teach them.

This document describes several active learning methods for helping students learn how course concepts are organized.

A problem solving scale with 5 levels of expertise.