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This list of inclusive teaching strategies was created as part of the Schreyer Institute's Creating Inclusive Courses workshop. The workshop activity is also available in this repository. The list was compiled over many years and is intended to help instructors recognize what they might already be doing to demonstrate that all students are welcome contributors to the course learning community. This is not a "checklist." Creating inclusive course environments requires sincerity, intentionality, and reflection, not simply enacting a list of strategies. These strategies are most effective when combined with other efforts such as critical self-reflection reflection, learning about antiracist pedagogies, and taking steps to decolonize our classrooms.

List of references and citations for creating inclusive courses and classrooms; and in support of teaching diverse students.

Links to websites about microagressions, stereotype threat, implicit attitudes (hidden biases), teaching for diversity, teaching in multicultural classrooms, diversity resources. URLs for videos about how microaggresions feel to recipients, reverse-microaggressions on white people (helps some white people understand microaggressions better)

We use this handout in our inclusive teaching workshop. It is adapted from “Managing Hot Moments in the Classroom” by Lee Warren at Harvard's Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. It includes suggestions about how to manage difficult conversations by planning before the course as well ideas for what to do during the course ("in the moment").

Professor Christine Hockings (UK), April 2010
Inclusive learning and teaching in higher education refers to the ways in which pedagogy, curricula and assessment are designed and delivered to engage students in learning that is meaningful, relevant and accessible to all. It embraces a view of the individual and individual difference as the source of diversity that can enrich the lives and learning of others.
This publication includes summaries of key research on how inclusion practices impact students' learning, identities, and belonging.

This page lists resources that can help faculty create inclusive classrooms. Resources are related to diversity and inclusivity.

This is a workshop activity used in our Inclusive Courses workshop. It is intended to help instructors to recognize the wide range of things that they currently do, or can do, to demonstrate to students that each has unique contributions to make in the course learning community.

This is a short article written by Chris Gamrat, Penn State faculty member in IST, about Inclusive Teaching and Course Design. It appeared in Educause Review on February 6, 2020. Faculty and instructional designers can employ a number of strategies to create courses and learning environments where students feel welcome and connected. Determining how best to incorporate Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) into course design and teaching can feel overwhelming. Gamrat created a list of considerations for instructional designers and faculty to help create courses for a spectrum of students who are, or become, minoritized or marginalized at our instituions and in our online courses. I hope that these recommendations and examples offer faculty and instructional designers a new perspective on student needs and strategies for creating a caring learning environment.

Inclusive Teaching. This document includes the slides and handouts used in Linse & Weinstein's workshop introducing faculty to specific actions that they can take immediately to make their courses more inclusive. Based on our experience, it is best to provide the Strategies early in the workshop because it addresses faculty members' primary concern--what to do! By addressing faculty needs first, we have found it allows us to have richer discussions about the two most intractable issues to creating inclusive learning environments, Microaggressions and Stereotype Threat.

This document provides suggestions for thinking about addressing diversity in the classroom and incorporating those thoughts into your teaching portfolio.

This list includes several books/articles with in-depth discussion of the usefulness of case studies in teaching/learning.

--Hutchings, Pat. “Cases about College Teaching and Learning: A Picture of Emerging Practice.” Ch. 1 of Using Cases To Improve College Teaching: A Guide to More Reflective Practice. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Higher Education, 1993.
--Stinson, John E. and Richard G. Milter. “Problem-Based Learning in Business Education: Curriculum Design and Implementation Issues.” New Directions for Teaching and Learning 68 (Winter 1996), 33-42.
--Silverman, Rita, William M. Welty, and Sally Lyon. Case Studies for Teacher Problem Solving, 2nd edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1996.

Making the Right Impressions on the First Day of Class
What can be done then to make a positive first impression in the classroom? In a study
(Hayward, 2001) where students were given a survey after the first class meeting, factors
contributing to positive perceptions of teaching effectiveness were identified.
The power of knowing, in the first two seconds, is our ability to make quick judgments. Think back to when you were in school and how long did it take you to size up a professor? Did you know the first day how good a teacher was, or did it take several classes or the entire semester? Research has found that students watching a silent two-second video clip of a teacher they have never met reach very similar conclusions about that teacher’s effectiveness when compared to students who have sat in the teacher’s class for a semester.
Students have been found to quickly size up a professor on these four factors:

This is a one-page tip sheet that guides instructors in thinking about instruction beyond just covering content.

This is a one-page tip sheet that guides instructors in thinking about how to "decode" their discipline for students and to strategize ways to help students navigate the challenges of learning in the discipline.

This one-page tip sheet provides background and approaches to guide instructors in directing students toward mastery of content.

This one-page tip sheet discusses the idea of "differentiated instruction" and suggests ways instructors can differentiate their own instruction with respect to content, processes, and products.

This one-page tip sheet guides instructors through evidence-based components of an effective lesson plan.

Support in the appropriate use of technology for teaching, learning, and research.

Enrich the educational experience of students through information technology.

This is a blog post by Nick Carvone, Director of Teaching and Learning, for the Bedford/St. Martin's imprint of Macmillan Education. As the title suggests, this site shares ideas for how to teach your students to write more constructive comments on those portions of their teaching evaluations.

This book describes a research-based approach to teaching science to help students gain conceptual understanding. Originally based on biology courses, the book describes an approach rooted in active learning, backward design, and assessment.

This book summarizes what is known about teaching and learning from fields such as education and cognitive psychology and provides applications for use in post-secondary science classrooms.

This book describes practical strategies for teaching science and engineering courses using writing and collaborative learning. Emphasis is on how to help students build problem-solving skills and conceptual understanding.

This book describes activities college faculty can use to help their students understand the nature of science and engineering, to understand science and engineering concepts, and to solve problems. The book emphasizes how to help students examine and alter their conceptual frameworks.

This very comprehensive website from Carlton College is aimed at both post-secondary and K-12 teachers. In addition to other STEM resources, it has teaching resources for the geosciences.

This book is a collection of 24 articles, written from the two-year college perspective, featuring the most useful and relevant insights and advice from NSTA’s Journal of College Science Teaching. The collection is divided into four sections: unique issues associated with teaching science in two-year colleges, curricular issues, teaching strategies, and using technology in the classroom.




This book is a collection of essays from the Journal of College Science Teaching which describes in detail the case study method as applied to the sciences. The book offers strategies, tips, examples, ideas, and resources as an alternative to traditional lecture formats.

This book defines assessment, and explains how both teachers and students do it to assess student learning and teaching effectiveness. The book describes assessment practices and best practices for assessment in the college classroom.

This book describes current educational theory and research and offers models of teaching and learning that go beyond the typical lecture-laboratory format. Topics include: student motivation, active learning, use of technology in teaching, and teaching diverse students.

This book is a collection of 14 articles from the Journal of College Science Teaching that describe techniques that promote higher-order thinking and inquiry skills. The techniques are alternatives to lecturing, and range from small tweaks to large-scale changes for courses.

This book is a collection of ten articles from college science professors who use investigative learning (also known as inquiry-based instruction) to help students understand how science works. The articles explain how students--including non-majors--can learn to do real-world science.

This report give a brief review of research methods employed in studies and proposes guiding principles for designing research studies and evaluating research proposals in mathematics and science education. While the document is not intended for Post-secondary educators, it will be of interest to those interested in getting started with Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) projects in STEM fields.

A list of SoTL journals compiled by librarians at Illinois State University. These journals are not STEM-specific, but some of their articles do address STEM teaching topics.

An online module designed to help you work more efficiently with student teams within your classes. This module is designed to help you work with teams in both face-to-face and online courses. Regardless of what type of course you teach, you should find helpful information within this course regarding the formation, facilitation and performance of student teams.

This is a faculty peer evaluation form (peer observation, classroom observation). It has a "checklist" format, rather than a scaled rating (Likert scale) format. This form asks faculty peer reviewers to note the presence of teaching activities/behaviors that have already been established as indicative of high quality teaching. This form is intentionally designed to be shortened by the faculty in an academic unit so that it reflects the unit's teaching values, and the priorities of the unit. It should not be used "as is" because it is too much to expect reviewers to evaluate; fewer items per section will make the form easier to use.

The form was created based in January 2006 based on information in: Chism, N.V.N. (1999) Chapter 6: Classroom Observation, Peer Review of Teaching: A Sourcebook. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.

Rubric used to evaluated teaching grant proposals.

Fern K. Willits and Mark A. Brennan 2016 Changing Perceptions of the University as a Community of Learning: The Case of Penn State. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 28(1), 66-74.
Supported by a grant from the Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence

Active Learning Spaces and Active Learning Classrooms, the built environment for learning, is a growing field and of increasing interest to faculty teaching in newly (re)designed classrooms and institutional space planners. This list of resources was collected in March 2017 by Michael Palmer of the University of Virginia's teaching center from colleagues in the professional society of faculty developers, the POD Network.

This definition was prepared by the Teaching Excellence Committee, Teaching and Learning Consortium, Penn State in 2005.

Created for faculty and other academics who are interested in getting involved in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Recommended resources include the following topics: "Preparing to do SOTL," "Books on SOTL Research," "Journals for Educational Research," and "Videos of SoTL researchers discussing different aspects of SOTL."

The Lecture/Discussion Facilitation Template was distributed at the 2017 Lilly Evidence-based Teaching & Learning Conference held in Bethesda, MD June 1 - 4, 2017. Use it during lectures as a low-stakes, largely anonymous method to gauge students’ understanding, as a pop quiz or survey, or to keep track of in-class group activities. The template can improve student participation and engagement by minimizing their fears of low (or even “too high”) performance before their classmates, and it provides a demonstrable, observable, measurable, and active way to gain a sense of how well students are “getting it,” beyond the glint in their eyes. In that sense, it serves as a quick formative assessment tool that can be customized on demand.

Extensive set of resources for instructors who are using case studies. Includes more than 500 cases from various science and engineering disciplines, along with additional information about effectively using cases to promote learning.

This journal focuses on various ways to support and strengthen the teaching of academic writing. From the journal's Website: "Across the Disciplines, a refereed journal devoted to language, learning, and academic writing, publishes articles relevant to writing and writing pedagogy in all their intellectual, political, social, and technological complexity."

Student ratings are not the only option to provide evidence in the evaluation of teaching. There is a broad range of alternatives to consider beyond student ratings in the delicate decision-making processes to improve teaching and determine the promotion and tenure of faculty. Yet, despite the constant barrage of attacks on the integrity, reliability, and validity of student ratings, their use in higher education is at an all-time high.
So what do student ratings actually contribute to decisions about teaching and faculty? Should they be abandoned? Should you focus on the other options? This article examines student ratings and 14 alternatives to guide your plans to evaluate teaching in your department.

A customizable observation tool used observations of teaching. The tool is a protocol that produces robust and nuanced depictions of classroom dynamics between teachers, students, and technologies. Based on research-based learning theories, the TDOP has been extensively field-tested and is being used by over 300 researchers, program evaluators, and professional developers to create detailed descriptions of what happens inside classrooms.

Some discipline-based professional or scholarly associations have developed freely available teaching guides for faculty in that discipline e.g., the Mathematical Association of America's Instructional Practices Guide (https://www.dropbox.com/s/xpvkni52tkf0wgt/MAA_IP_Guide_V1-1.pdf?dl=0), the American Psychological Association has several free books and collections of materials about teaching psychology.

Decoding the Disciplines is a process for increasing student learning by narrowing the gap between expert and novice thinking. Beginning with the identification of bottlenecks to learning in particular disciplines, it seeks to make explicit the tacit knowledge of experts and to help students master the mental actions they need for success in particular courses. Bottlenecks key areas where students get stuck or where students can't progress in their learning. Experts who they are very familiar with the discipline sometimes have a hard time helping novices through these difficult passageways. This process provides teaching strategies that help faculty experts help their novice students to think in disciplinary ways.

This webpage includes suggestions that will help faculty to create a safe classroom environments in which all students, regardless of identity, will feel welcomed. The page includes suggestions for how to create inclusive classrooms from diverse classrooms.

This webpage includes a list of resources to help faculty work with diverse student populations. It provides resources that are specific for various minority groups, such as women or students of color. The resources are related to diversity and inclusion.

This webpage lists many resources to help faculty work with diverse students, including strategies for working with specific minority groups, such as students with disabilities. The resources are related to diversity and inclusion.

Strategies for adapting face-to-face teaching for online, flexible, or mixed-mode learning environments. This document was offered as a web resource for faculty teaching online, flexible, or mixed-mode courses during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is available here for archival purposes.

Strategies for adapting face-to-face teaching and assessments for online, flexible, or mixed-mode learning environments. This document was offered as a web resource for faculty teaching online, flexible, or mixed-mode courses during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is available here for archival purposes.

Strategies for adapting face-to-face assessments for online, flexible, or mixed-mode learning environments. This document was offered as a web resource for faculty teaching online, flexible, or mixed-mode courses during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is available here for archival purposes.

A course redesign tool developed by the UC Berkeley Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management in partnership with the UC Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning. This tool supports instructors to develop anti-racist approaches to course design and teaching practices through an accessible and user-friendly model to consider how their instructional choices impact student outcomes. The tool is meant for self-assessment, not to assess score courses or instructors.

Statement of Practices for the Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness for Promotion and Tenure
This document was created by the University Faculty Senate as an Advisory and Consultative report on April 30, 1985. The Statement of Practices was revised by the faculty senate on February 21, 1989, and again on September 16, 2003. This statement was extracted from Appendix A of the 2021-2022 Administrative Guidelines for Policy AC23 (formerly HR23): Promotion and Tenure Procedures and Regulations 2021-2022.

The purpose of this document is to provide information for instructors who are concerned about how to handle election-related student comments and questions. The pre-election information below provides information about how to respond to student questions about voting, as well as relevant Penn State policies. The post-election section includes information about what you might consider as you plan for your course sessions that occur immediately after the election. Some of the resources were developed for the 2020 election but are still useful for this election.

The purpose of this article is to provide a process for centers for teaching and learning to demonstrate their success and their value to constituents. Faculty developers have long requested an approach that would guide relevant and meaningful data collection. Nearly every CTL must develop a strategic plan, but too often they sit on a shelf gathering dust. The purpose of a strategic plan is to guide decision-making about how the unit spends its resources in service of its purpose (mission).
Linse, A. R. & Hood, L. N. (in press). Building a strategic plan that guides assessment: A case study from a teaching and learning center. Journal on Centers for Teaching and Learning.

This is a 2-page flyer provided by the CIRTL Network (Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning). It includes quotes from participants about how participating benefitted them. Many are now professors. The second page is focuses on additional benefits for students, faculty, and academic units.

This resource was designed to help UBC instructors self-assess their teaching dossier (portfolio) and reflect on its content. It can be used alongside the detailed information in the Teaching Portfolio section at the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, University of British Columbia.

Creating a sense of belonging is critical for student learning and setting the tone for an inclusive classroom begins on, or even before, the first day of class. This handout provides sample questions for a questionnaire you can use to get to know students, a few considerations for your own introduction as an instructor, and suggestions for introducing your course.

Large classes are among the most important because many students enrolled are new to the college experience. The big challenges of teaching large classes include finding ways to engage students, providing timely feedback, and managing logistics. When faced with these challenges, many instructors revert to lectures and multiple-choice tests. There are alternatives. This special report describes some alternative teaching and course management techniques to get students actively involved without an inordinate amount of work on the instructor’s part. From the Teaching Professor, Magna.

Active Learning, Strategies for Success is written for instructors who are not practiced at teaching actively. It was created after hearing from faculty "That active learning stuff doesn't work for me. I tried it and the students hated it!" Following a 4-step process can help ensure that your early attempts at active teaching are more successful. These steps have been used by hundreds of faculty to effectively introduce students to active learning. For suggestions of activities look for "Interactive Learning" in the repository search box.

This resource is from Texas Tech University and is written by Jenny Lloyd-Strovas, Ph.D. at TTU's Teaching, Learning, and Professional Development Center
Texas Tech University in August, 2015.
Teaching large classes can be a daunting experience. How do you keep students engaged and active without losing control of the classroom? With so many students, how do you know if they are learning? Should you attempt to take attendance or risk losing students? How do you build rapport when learning 200 names isn’t a possibility? If you have taught (or are preparing to teach) a large class, you have probably asked yourself these questions. Here, I will discuss possible solutions for these challenges and more. This resource is organized to be a quick and efficient reference for challenges that you are experiencing in your classroom.

Teaching Large Classes by Adam Wilsman, Center for Teaching, Vanderbilt University
Teaching a large class poses many challenges, both in and out of the classroom. In the classroom, large enrollments can promote student disengagement and feelings of alienation, which can erode students’ sense of responsibility and lead to behaviors that both reflect and promote lack of engagement. Logistics can also be a challenge when teaching a large class. How does one best manage the daily administration of what can often feel like a small city? This resource presents strategies to help instructors deal with some of the challenges associated with teaching large classes.

Tips for Teaching Large Classes Online, Faculty Focus, Rob Kelly (3-17-2009) writes about strategies used by Jonathan Mathews, Professor of Energy and Mineral Engineering at Penn State. Prof. Mathews still regularly teaches large enrollment online courses.

This FAQ about effective teaching and learning in large courses (large classes) from the Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation. The questions focus on reducing anonymity, managing and engaging students, active learning, checking for learning, incorporating writing and group work without overwhelming yourself.

From UC Berkeley's Center for Teaching and Learning, Considerations for Large Lecture Classes provides six ways to make lectures in a large enrollment course more manageable and effective. The strategies include communicating explicit learning expectations, not trying to "cover" everything, focusing on analysis of issues or problems, engaging students through active learning practices, providing feedback to students, and using clickers to poll students.

This article from UC Berkeley's' Center for Teaching & Learning, reviews how to create opportunities for your students to build deeper understanding of concepts through articulation and elaboration, as they engage in learning conversations (discourse & sensemaking) in a large lecture hall. These strategies shift some of the intellectual work to the students, as they offer explanations, summaries, elaborations, articulations of the material, and find ways to connect to what they already know with what they are learning in your course (Allen & Tanner, 2005). The title of the article is "Discourse & Sensemaking Strategies in Large Lecture."

Allen, D., & Tanner, K. (2005). Infusing active learning into the large-enrollment biology class: Seven strategies, from the simple to complex. Cell Biology Education (CBE), 4, 262-268. doi:10.1187/cbe.05-08-0113

This article is written by one of the most well-known professors in engineering education, Richard Felder. While not new, is still relevant to instructors teaching large courses. Felder says: "When we find ourselves teaching a mob, it's easy to throw up our hands, conclude that there's no chance of getting any responsiveness out of 150 or 300 students in an auditorium... Fortunately, there are ways to make large classes almost as effective as their smaller counterparts. Without turning yourself inside out, you can get students actively involved, help them develop a sense of community, and give frequent homework assignments without killing yourself (or your teaching assistants) with impossible grading loads. BEATING THE NUMBERS GAME: EFFECTIVE TEACHING IN LARGE CLASSES, by Richard M. Felder, Department of Chemical Engineering
North Carolina State University. Presented at the 1997 ASEE Annual Conference, Milwaukee, WI, June 1997.

We include this article in our repository to demonstrate that faculty have been concerned about and practicing active learning in large courses for decades. This is a classic from 1987 by Peter Frederick in a volume edited by well-known champion of excellent teaching and Prof. Emerita at Penn State, Maryellen Weimer. Teaching Large Classes Well. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 32: 45-56. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Frederick discusses interactive lectures, using questions to involve the class, asking specific questions (rather than "does everyone understand? which no one wants to answer), using small groups, using problem-solving to foster critical thinking, debates, simulations, and role playing. While his examples might be a bit dated, this still makes a lot of sense and provides useful ideas to adapt for the 21st century.

Group Work, by K. J. Wilson, P. Brickman, and C. J. Brame, CBE—Life Sciences EducationVol. 17(!). 22 Mar 2018
This article describes an online teaching guide that provides an overview of research and resources about group work. While directed at STEM faculty new to group work or who have faced challenges implementing group work, this is a useful read for faculty in and outside of the STEM disciplines.

Helping Practitioners and Researchers Identify and Use Education Research Literature. By K. J. Wilson and C. J. Brame. CBE—Life Sciences Education, 17(1). 22 Mar 2018
This article discusses a study that reveals the impact that active learning has on students' ability to learn fundamental concepts and skills varies with instructor knowledge of teaching and learning. The goal of the study was to discover knowledge that is important to effective active learning in large undergraduate STEM courses. The authors note that experts more commonly consider how students are held accountable, notice topic-specific student difficulties, elicited and responded to student thinking, and provided for students to generate their own ideas and work.

Abstract: Writing multiple-choice test items to measure student learning in higher education is a challenge. Based on extensive scholarly research and experience, the author describes various item formats, offers guidelines for creating these items, and provides many examples of both good and bad test items. He also suggests some shortcuts for developing test items. All of this advice is based on extensive scholarly research and experience. Creating valid multiple-choice items is a difficult task, but it contributes greatly to the teaching and learning process for undergraduate, graduate, and professional-school courses.

Author: Thomas M. Haladyna, Arizona State University

Keywords: Multiple-choice items, selected response, test-item formats, examinations

The following teaching tips are based on books and articles addressing some of the most important issues any faculty member in their first years (and beyond) will face in the classroom. The intent for presenting them in this handout format is to provide just enough on each issue to give you some idea for your next class, but not enough to convince you that’s all there is to it. All these tips are based on more substantial treatments in the literature, and the references at the end of each tip sheet will show you where to look next for more in-depth discussion. On the last page, you will find additional references in three different media that help you reflect on many more issues in higher-education teaching.

Posted on Friday, September 26, 2014
by Julie Thompson Klein, Ph.D.
Many consider interdisciplinarity to be synonymous with teamwork. It is not. Individuals engage successfully in a variety of solo interdisciplinary activities, ranging from borrowing tools, methods, and concepts from another discipline to teaching courses that migrate to a new hybrid interdiscipline. Moreover, a team may not necessarily be interdisciplinary.

This document guides faculty interested in course- or classroom-based research on student learning in the design process. Following the guidelines will help ensure that the research projects will be sound and robust and resulting insights can inform and extend our understanding of the processes of learning and of supporting that learning with effective, evidence-based instruction. While created to meet requirements for Canadian standards, the resource is also useful for researchers in the U.S.
The guide takes researchers through the essentials of the Canadian standards for ethical practice in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) which are unique because of participants (human subjects) are also typically the researcher’s students. This Guide translates the Canadian TCPS2 (2014) for the researcher conducting SoTL research.

This resource is written by Lisa Fedoruk at the University of Calgary, with contributions by 18 scholars across Canada. It is grounded in the Canadian document governing research ethics, but the specific strategies listed throughout will be useful and helpful for researchers in other countries. Provided by Nancy Chick, Academic Director of the Taylor Institute for Teaching & Learning, University Chair in Teaching and Learning, University of Calgary.

Heavily abridged version of Weinstein, Y., Madan, C. R., & Smith, M. A. (in press). Teaching the science of learning. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, prepared for and presented at "Reframing Testing as a Learning Experience: Three Strategies for Use in the Classroom and at Home" on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017.

Six key learning strategies from research in cognitive psychology can be applied to education: spaced practice, interleaving, elaborative interrogation, concrete examples, dual coding, and retrieval practice. However, a recent report (Pomerance, Greenberg, & Walsh, 2016) found that few teacher-training textbooks cover these principles; current study-skills courses also lack coverage of these important learning strategies. Students are therefore missing out on mastering techniques they could use on their own to learn effectively. This handout contains the six key learning strategies to address those concerns.

Let’s Talk About Power: How Teacher Use of Power Shapes Relationships and Learning
Leslie Frances Reid, Jalal Kawash
Proceedings of the University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, Vol 2, 2017
Abstract
Teachers’ use of power in learning environments affects our students’ experiences, our teaching experiences, and the extent to which learning goals are met. The types of conversations we hold or avoid with students send cues regarding how we use power to develop relationships, influence behaviour and entice motivation. Reliance on prosocial forms of power, such as referent, reward, and expert, have a positive impact on outcomes such as learning and motivation, as well as perceived teacher credibility. Overuse of antisocial forms of power that include legitimate and coercive powers negatively affect these same outcomes. In this paper, we share stories from our teaching experiences that highlight how focusing on referent, reward and expert power bases to connect, problem solve, and negotiate challenges with our students has significantly enhanced our teaching practice. We provide resources that can be used by teachers to become aware of and utilize prosocial power strategies in their practice through self-reflection and peer and student feedback.

The Role of Interactive Digital Simulations in Student Conversations About Visualizing Molecules
Yuen-ying Carpenter, Erin Rae Sullivan
Proceedings of the University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, Vol. 2, 2017

Abstract
The visualization of chemical compounds in three-dimensions is a foundational skill in the study and practice of chemistry and related fields, and one which has the potential to be supported by interaction with virtual models. Here, we present a collaborative learning activity piloted in first-year chemistry which investigates if inquiry-driven interactive technology can contribute meaningfully to student conversations around this topic, and how students’ conversations and practices may shift when driven by feedback from an interactive simulation. Our initial observations from this pilot project suggest that students engaged in collaborative sense-making and discussion around key ideas throughout this activity. Students’ post-activity reflections also highlighted their positive experiences and increased confidence with the topic afterwards. The unique dynamics of these interactions lead us to propose a novel framing of interactive visualizations as participants rather than merely as resources in student learning conversations.

Using Mental Health and Wellness as a Framework for Course Design
Patricia Dyjur, Gabrielle Lindstrom, Nahum Arguera, Haboun Bair
Proceedings of the University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, Vol. 2, 2017

Abstract
Mental health and wellness is a concern, not only for students, but for instructors in higher education as well. Course design can have a positive or negative impact on both student and instructor wellness, especially around stress and anxiety with assessments, workload, and due dates. Factors of course design such as policies and values, academic expectations, learning environment and learning experiences, student assessment, and reflection and resilience can play an important role in supporting wellness. In this paper we provide examples of how each factor can affect wellness, and offer questions that an instructor can consider when designing a course with wellness in mind.

The Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver Campus, has released five short videos that we have created to help build capacity for peer reviewers and for instructors being peer reviewed on their teaching. This is video 1 of 5.

The Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver Campus, has released five short videos that we have created to help build capacity for peer reviewers and for instructors being peer reviewed on their teaching. This is video 2 of 5.

The Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver Campus, has released five short videos that we have created to help build capacity for peer reviewers and for instructors being peer reviewed on their teaching. This is video 3 of 5.

The Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver Campus, has released five short videos that we have created to help build capacity for peer reviewers and for instructors being peer reviewed on their teaching. This is video 4 of 5.

The Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver Campus, has released five short videos that we have created to help build capacity for peer reviewers and for instructors being peer reviewed on their teaching. This is video 5 of 5.

Promoting Supportive Academic Environments for Faculty with Mental Illnesses: Resource Guide and Suggestions for Practice. This guide focuses on ways to make college and university campuses more accessible for faculty with mental disabilities. It provides concrete suggestions for creating a “culture of access” by offering effective strategies for promoting inclusive language, managing accommodations, and revising policies around recruitment, hiring, and leaves of absence. The guide provides a review research on the experiences of academic faculty with mental illnesses and recommendations for academic administrators and colleagues to promote a more welcoming work environment in higher education.

This guide is intended to be helpful for faculty, instructional designers, and multimedia specialists that are in the early stages of creating a video for teaching purposes. The guide breaks down the many types of pedagogically-useful videos into several types and sub-types in order to help you think about the best approaches for discussing your content (each has an example of a low-cost and a higher-cost video).

The guide was designed to take you through each step of discovering what kind of video best suits your purposes. It is recommended you select a video category, read about what attributes define that category, and then explore the sub-categories that further explores organizing content in this medium. The guide can be used as often as you like and will email you the results of your exploration as well as provide links and information on pursuing the creation of your video and next steps.

This flyer lists a variety of services provided by our consultants divided into 5 broad categories: Course Design & Planning, Teaching Strategies, Testing & Grading, Reearch on Teaching & Learning, and Course Evaluation.

Faculty testimonials about reasons why other faculty might want to work with the faculty consultants at the Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence, our teaching center.

Instructional Foundations is a series of workshops for graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and instructors
from all disciplines who have never taught at the university level (grading experience OK) prior to Fall 2016. The
series is designed to provide people new to college teaching with knowledge, skills and confidence they can use in
their first teaching experience.

Everywhere you turn, colleagues are talking about evidence-based teaching. But even when
the evidence is convincing, it can be tough to choose a strategy and begin using it well. This
navigational guide will help you get started.
Horii, C. V. (2018) Wise Instructional Choices in an Evidence-driven Era. NEA Higher Education Advocate, 36(3), 6-9.

“What Should Penn State Consider in the Evaluation of Teaching Besides Student Ratings and Peer Observation?” University Faculty Senate, Commonwealth Caucus Meeting, Monday, September 17, 2018
Senate Meeting Room, Kern Bldg.

The Commonwealth Caucus discussed additional sources of information and evidence that could inform the evaluation of teaching.

2019 Teaching Award Rubric

The Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning, University of Calgary developed the Taylor Institute Guide on Teaching Dossiers (aka Teaching Portfolios) and Philosophy Statements. This guide is a comprehensive resource for creating a teaching dossier that presents an integrated summary of your teaching philosophy, approaches, accomplishments, and effectiveness. Based on a compilation of current scholarship and open access resources this guide uses a literature-informed framework for developing teaching expertise to lead you through a series of practical exercises to develop and strengthen your teaching dossier and philosophy.

All materials are licensed under the creative commons and we invite you to share, use and adapt this guide within your local contexts and/or educational development initiatives.

The peer review of teaching—like the peer review of research—is a widely accepted mechanism for promoting and assuring quality academic work and is required for the purpose of promotion and tenure at Penn State. The peer review process in resident instruction typically involves a faculty reviewer observing a peer’s classroom. The reviewer then summarizes her observations in a document that is to be included in the reviewee’s dossier.

To address the need for online course peer review in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, Ann Taylor, a member of the Dutton Institute, has designed, implemented, and assessed a peer review process for online teaching. The Peer Review Guide for Online Teaching at Penn State is based on the “Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education,” a summary of 50 years of higher education research that addresses good teaching and learning practices.

The peer review of teaching—like the peer review of research—is a widely accepted mechanism for promoting and assuring quality academic work and is required for the purpose of promotion and tenure at Penn State. The peer review process in resident instruction typically involves a faculty reviewer observing a peer’s classroom. The reviewer then summarizes her observations in a document that is to be included in the reviewee’s dossier.

To address the need for faculty peer reviews of teaching at Penn State, members of the Penn State Online Coordinating Council's Sub-committee on Faculty Engagement have designed, implemented, and assessed a peer review process for face-to-face and hybrid course use.

In higher education, peer review stands as the prime means for ensuring that scholarship is of the highest quality, and from it flows consequential assessments that shape careers, disciplines, and entire institutions. While peer review is well established as a means of evaluating research across the disciplines, it is less common in the assessment of teaching. Yet it is no less useful, since it can improve what Ernest Boyer has called the “scholarship of teaching and learning” by enhancing instructional and faculty development, by bolstering the integrity of personnel decisions, and by enabling more intentional and mutually supportive communities of scholar teachers. This guide is intended as an introduction to the basics of peer review, including its purposes, challenges, and common practices. The primary audience for this guide consists of departments, programs, or schools considering implementing peer review, although individual faculty, staff, and students are likely to find what follows interesting, as well.

Often called “peer observation of teaching ” or “peer evaluation of teaching,” peer review of teaching (PRT) involves seeking feedback from an informed colleague for the purposes of improving one’s practice (formative assessment) and/or evaluating it (summative assessment). Texas A&M University's Faculty Performance Evaluation Task Force recommended having separate review processes for formative and summative assessment using multiple sources of data from students, peers, administrators, and as well as faculty themselves for evaluating teaching. Includes institutional perspectives and supporting videos from the University of Texas.

This paper outlines twelve tips for undertaking peer observation of teaching in medical education, using the peer review model and the experiences of the authors. An accurate understanding of teaching effectiveness is required by individuals, medical schools, and universities to evaluate the learning environment and to substantiate academic and institutional performance. Peer Observation of Teaching is one tool that provides rich, qualitative evidence for teachers, quite different from closed-ended student evaluations. When Peer Observation of Teaching is incorporated into university practice and culture, and is conducted in a mutually respectful and supportive way, it has the potential to facilitate reflective change and growth for teachers.

Learn more about faculty options for Teaching and Learning Scholarship (TLS) at Penn State. TLS is also known as Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and it forms the foundation for evidence-based teaching. This flyer outlines short term, medium range, and long term options for TLS support and resources. Contact information is included on the flyer.

This document shows how to add the Penn State "Teaching Events" calendar to your list of Outlook Calendars. Over 40 units at Penn State offer Teaching and Learning events, seminars, visiting speakers, workshops, short courses, etc. The calendar was created so all faculty and TAs can see what is happening around the university. Some events will be open only for targeted audiences, but others will be open to all. Before scheduling an event please ensure that other events with similar audiences are not already on the calendar!

This is a resource indicating technological tools to support teaching and learning at Penn State. This document contains a list of centrally supported tech, and also other that are not centrally supported but have wide support available online.

These PowerPoint slides accompanied a presentation by James M. Lang delivered at University Park on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. Research from the learning sciences and from a variety of educational settings suggests that a small number of key principles can improve learning in almost any type of college or university course, from traditional lectures to flipped classrooms. This workshop will introduce some of those principles, offer practical suggestions for how they might foster positive change in higher education teaching and learning, and guide faculty participants to consider how these principles might manifest themselves in their current and upcoming courses.

These PowerPoint slides accompanied a presentation by James M. Lang delivered at University Park on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. As faculty struggle with the problem of distracted students on our campuses and in our classes, they have become increasingly frustrated by the ways in which digital devices can interfere with student learning. But are students today more distracted than they were in the past? Has technology reduced their ability to focus and think deeply, as some popular books have argued? This interactive lecture draws upon scholarship from history, neuroscience, and education in order to provide productive new pathways for faculty to understand the distractible nature of the human brain, work with students to moderate the effects of distraction in their learning, and even leverage the distractible nature of our minds for new forms of connected and creative thinking.

This is a recorded webinar presented by James M. Lang at University Park on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. Research from the learning sciences and from a variety of educational settings suggests that a small number of key principles can improve learning in almost any type of college or university course, from traditional lectures to flipped classrooms. This workshop will introduce some of those principles, offer practical suggestions for how they might foster positive change in higher education teaching and learning, and guide faculty participants to consider how these principles might manifest themselves in their current and upcoming courses.

This webinar was recorded by Penn State Libraries staff using Mediasite Live, and it is stored in the libraries' Mediasite catalog. The Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence bears no responsibility for the quality of the recording, its maintenance, its availability, nor its functionality. For help with the recording, call (814) 865-5400 or send an email message to MediaTechSupport@psu.edu.

This is a recorded webinar presented by James M. Lang at University Park on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. As faculty struggle with the problem of distracted students on our campuses and in our classes, they have become increasingly frustrated by the ways in which digital devices can interfere with student learning. But are students today more distracted than they were in the past? Has technology reduced their ability to focus and think deeply, as some popular books have argued? This interactive lecture draws upon scholarship from history, neuroscience, and education in order to provide productive new pathways for faculty to understand the distractible nature of the human brain, work with students to moderate the effects of distraction in their learning, and even leverage the distractible nature of our minds for new forms of connected and creative thinking.

This webinar was recorded by Penn State Libraries staff using Mediasite Live, and it is stored in the libraries' Mediasite catalog. The Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence bears no responsibility for the quality of the recording, its maintenance, its availability, nor its functionality. For help with the recording, call (814) 865-5400 or send an email message to MediaTechSupport@psu.edu.

This is the second report of the Committee on Assessing Teaching Effectiveness submitted to Kathy Bieschke, Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs. This report is recommends options for improving future evaluation of teaching for tenure, promotion, annual review, and reappointment. The committee's recommendations address the unacceptable over-reliance on student feedback in the process of evaluation--specifically the numerical ratings of the Student Ratings of Teaching Effectiveness (SRTE) and the ‘Open Ended Item’ responses, which serve to amplify systemic inequities and hierarchies within our teaching community. The first report of the committee provided recommendations for evaluating teaching for promotion & tenure during the pandemic of 2020.

This is the committee's second report [for Report 1, see Appendix M in the NEW: 2020-2021 Administrative Guidelines for Policy AC23 (formerly HR23): Promotion and Tenure Procedures and Regulations]

A SharePoint site for Penn State employees and students that contains curated research and other resources on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) topics, including antiracism, intersectionality, implicit bias and microagressions; equity-minded teaching and assessment; and rights, responsibilities, and responses related to bias and free expression in our classrooms and work spaces.

The Mindset Kit is a free set of online lessons and practices designed to help you teach and foster adaptive beliefs about learning. This website includes sections about Growth Mindset, Teachingt a Growth Mindset, Assessments for Growth Mindset, Belonging, Growth Mindset for Mentors, and more.

Teaching and Advising Resources for the Inauguration and Beyond
This document offers resources for creating a positive learning environment for all students and addressing challenges that might arise at the beginning of this semester. Main topics include: Checking in with Ourselves and Our Students; Engaging in Dialogue with Students; Managing Classroom Disruptions

Teaching Squares give faculty an opportunity to gain new insight into their teaching through a non-evaluative process of reciprocal classroom observation and self-reflection. A square is made up of four faculty, typically from different disciplines. The four faculty in each “teaching square” agree to visit each other’s classes over the course of a semester and then meet to discuss what they’ve learned from their observations.

Teaching Squares offer faculty an opportunity to observe colleagues in action and reflect on their own teaching practices. A teaching square is a group of four instructors who agree to observe each other a few times during a semester, using an agreed upon set of observation norms. It is designed to be a non-evaluative, supportive and growth-based process.

Developed by Anne Wessely of St. Louis Community College, the Teaching Squares program is designed to improve teaching skills and build community through a structured, non-threatening process of classroom observation and shared reflection. The process involves the best aspect of peer evaluation – observation and discussion – while excluding judgment and evaluation. Participants in a Teaching Square learn about the best practices of other faculty in order to improve their own teaching.

To Teach is to Learn is a series of podcasts focused on what it means to be surrounded by teaching and learning everyday. The series was created by Dr. Nichola Gutgold, Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State, after she received the 2018 Alumni Teaching Fellow Award. Dr. Gutgold interviews colleagues about teaching and learning. This episode features Mike Krasja, Assistant Teaching Professor of Business, recipient of Penn State's 2015 George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching, & Faculty Liaison for the Lehigh Valley LaunchBox.

To Teach is to Learn is a series of podcasts focused on what it means to be surrounded by teaching and learning everyday. The series was created by Dr. Nichola Gutgold, Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State, after she received the 2018 Alumni Teaching Fellow Award. Dr. Gutgold interviews colleagues about teaching and learning. This episode features Dr. Denise Ogden, Professor of Marketing and Penn State's 2017 George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching.

To Teach is to Learn is a series of podcasts focused on what it means to be surrounded by teaching and learning everyday. The series was created by Dr. Nichola Gutgold, Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State, after she received the 2018 Alumni Teaching Fellow Award. Dr. Gutgold interviews colleagues about teaching and learning. This episode features Dr. Doug Hochstetler, Professor of Philosophy and Interim Director of Academic Affairs at Penn State Lehigh Valley.

To Teach is to Learn is a series of podcasts focused on what it means to be surrounded by teaching and learning everyday. The series was created by Dr. Nichola Gutgold, Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State, after she received the 2018 Alumni Teaching Fellow Award. Dr. Gutgold interviews colleagues about teaching and learning. This episode features Dr. Charlotte Eubanks, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Japanese, and Asian Studies & Director of Graduate Studies, Comparative Literature.

To Teach is to Learn is a series of podcasts focused on what it means to be surrounded by teaching and learning everyday. The series was created by Dr. Nichola Gutgold, Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State, after she received the 2018 Alumni Teaching Fellow Award. Dr. Gutgold interviews colleagues about teaching and learning. This episode features Dr. Laurie Grobman, Professor of English and Women's Studies and recipient of the award for Outstanding Professor of the Year-Baccalaureate Colleges in 2014 from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

To Teach is to Learn is a series of podcasts focused on what it means to be surrounded by teaching and learning everyday. The series was created by Dr. Nichola Gutgold, Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State, after she received the 2018 Alumni Teaching Fellow Award. Dr. Gutgold interviews colleagues about teaching and learning. This episode features Dr. Karen Kackley-Dutt, Associate Teaching Professor, Biology & recipient of Penn State's George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2014.

Best Practices in the Evaluation of Teaching, by Stephen L. Benton, The IDEA Center and Suzanne Young, University of Wyoming
Effective instructor evaluation is complex and requires the use of multiple measures—formal and informal, traditional and authentic—as part of a balanced evaluation system. The student voice, a critical element of that balanced system, is appropriately complemented by instructor self-assessment and the reasoned judgments of other relevant parties, such as peers and supervisors. Integrating all three elements allows instructors to take a mastery approach to formative evaluation, trying out new teaching strategies and remaining open to feedback that focuses on how they might improve. Such feedback is most useful when it occurs in an environment that fosters challenge, support, and growth. Rather than being demoralized by their performance rankings, faculty can concentrate on their individual efforts and compare current progress to past performance. They can then concentrate on developing better teaching methods and skills rather than fearing or resenting comparisons to others. The evaluation of teaching thus becomes a rewarding process, not a dreaded event.
Keywords: Evaluation of teaching, summative evaluation, formative evaluation, mastery orientation

This website includes resources, lesson plans, and curriculum guides to help fill the gap in educating about the experiences and history of Muslims all over the world. Please share and use these resources widely to help collectively address this gap and combat islamophobia in our classrooms.

General recommendations for adapting teaching and assessment to a synchronous, remote course environment. This document was offered as page one of a web resource for faculty who transformed their courses from face-to-face to remote learning environments due to campus closures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. It is available here for archival purposes.

Strategies for adapting face-to-face teaching to a synchronous, remote course environment, arranged by some of the common course formats and course types. This document was offered as page two of a web resource for faculty who transformed their courses from face-to-face to remote learning environments due to campus closures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. It is available here for archival purposes.

Strategies for adapting face-to-face assessments to a synchronous, remote course environment, arranged by some of the common course formats and course types. This document was offered as page three of a web resource for faculty who transformed their courses from face-to-face to remote learning environments due to campus closures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. It is available here for archival purposes.

Penn State Teacher II 1997. Compendium of teaching tips and advice from seasoned faculty and graduate students. Includes sections on Course design, matching teaching methods with learning objectives, teaching large courses, evaluating student learning, collecting feedback, sample syllabi, feedback questionaires, grading standards, plagiarism, teaching philosophies.
Authored by D. Enerson, R. Neill Johnson, Susannah Milner, and Kathryn M. Plank.

Resources for teaching writing-intensive courses or integrating writing into any course; source is the WAC (Writing across the Curriculum) Clearinghouse.

This article, from Stanford's teaching and learning center, addresses strategies for improving assessment and grading practices in the classroom.

Guidelines for a teaching philosophy.

How to write a teaching philosophy.

Rubric for a teaching philosophy.

Evaluating a teaching philosophy.

This document provides a tool for use in evaluating a teaching philosophy, or teaching statement, that might be included in a job application packet or a tenure and promotion dossier. The matrix includes evaluative criteria for: history/herstory; relation to course(s) and discipline; grounding in theory and/or experience; appropriateness of language to audience; organization and succinctness

Provides a tool for evaluating a teaching philosophy / teaching statement that might be included in a job application packet or a tenure and promotion dossier. Areas evaluated include format, clarity, specificity, degree of reflectiveness, and foundation in beliefs about teaching and learning.

Best practices for teaching assistants as they interact with students. Includes tips on creating rapport and establishing effective boundaries.

A teaching portfolio provides materials associated with the experience of teaching and learning. This PDF describes items that might be included in a teaching portfolio, categorized by source: personal material, material from others, and products of good teaching.

Teaching portfolios provide an opportunity for instructors to show evidence that they are effective teachers. This PDF includes a list of questions that can be useful in filtering the kinds of evidence to be included in one's portfolio.

One-page handout of information about the Schreyer Institute and Student Ratings of Teaching Effectiveness (SRTE)

This presentation goes over the steps and skills for someone who is about to begin teaching online.

This document contains a list of websites and other resources for faculty who teach in large classes.

This handout highlights some of the current research based strategies for teaching millennial students.

This file describes the characteristics of adult learners and strategies for instructors who teach them.

This article "The Agony and the Equity," produced by the Center for Teaching at Stanford University in 1992, addresses issues associated with fair testing and grading.

2011 report on survey of student views on the quality of instruction at Penn State.

2011 report on survey of student views on the quality of instruction at Penn State

This report is the first in a series encompassed by the Quality of Instruction project. The research question guiding this report is: How do students and teachers view the instructional process at University Park? Information to address this question was obtained by surveying both students and faculty concerning their attitudes and experiences at University Park during the 1995-1996 academic year. These student and teacher surveys were made possible by support from the Penn State Alumni Association provided Fern (Bunny) Willits as the 1995-96 Alumni Teaching Fellow awardee and the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology. Class Attendance data were provided by the Office of Student Affairs Research and Assessment Pulse Survey.
The complete citation for the report is:
Willits, Fern K., Moore, Betty L., & Enerson, Diane M. (1997). Penn State, Quality of Instruction: Surveys of Students and Teachers at University Park. Pennsylvania State University.

This 1997 publication, written by Diane Enerson, R. Neill Johnson, Susannah Milner and Kathryn Plank, addresses all issues related to teaching, including course design, evaluation and assessment. Included are examples and perspectives from many Penn State instructors.

A brief description of course portfolios is provided along with resources and links to portfolio examples.

An agenda and outline of a workshop topics on an academic resume, a teaching philosophy and an electronic teaching portfolio. This workshop is intended for graduate students who are teaching.

Three-page overview of the steps in documenting one's teaching through a portfolio.

This document is a 1993 teaching newsletter from Stanford University that addresses the topic of classroom assessments - brief, typically non-graded assignments, that reveals to both teachers and students the extent to which students have the knowledge the teacher expects them to have.

Examples of rubrics for 1) Class participation; 2) lab reports; 3)oral participation; and 4) a teaching portfolio. Document also includes rubrics of different grain sizes: holistic rubric compared with grading checklist. There is also a case study about a request to have an assignment regraded.

This document describes criteria for an effective electronic teaching portfolio.

Penn State Abington instructor Ross Brinkert answers some frequently asked questions about hybrid teaching and learning based on his own early experiences.

This two-page guide offers a wide range of teaching tips specifically intended for international TAs.

Case study: A teaching assistant discovers that many of the class activities she planned will be physically impossible for one of her students.

This FAQ sheet offers many suggestions for making good use of teaching assistants and classroom space.

Instructional development philosophy written by Dr. Angela Linse, executive director of the Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence

This is a bibliography compiled by the University Libraries' Daniel Mack in 2009. It lists many resources on the topic of interdisciplinary teaching in higher education.

Intended audience: faculty developers. Teaching and faculty development philosophy of R. Neill Johnson, Although he is no longer at the Schreyer Institute, his statement provides a useful example.

This classroom observation form (faculty peer evaluation) provides both scaled and open-ended questions for use by anyone who is observing an instructor.

Listing of the Atherton Award winners up to 2010.

Listing of Teaching Fellow Award winners from 1986 to 2010.

Handout from Cindy Raynak's 2012 Teaching Professor presentation in Washington, DC. Describes the concept of "student-centered discussion," it's advantages for student learning, and how the process works.

General syllabus for the Course in College Teaching. The syllabus varies slightly from semester to semester depending upon who is leading the course, but this document gives an overview. For detailed information about the current semester's syllabus, contact site@psu.edu.

Teaching Professor 2013 Presentation. This presentation describes the characteristics of a positive peer review that encourages community.

This document describes how to use case studies as strategies to provide active learning experiences for students.

Drawing upon data from surveys of students and instructors at the 19 Commonwealth Campuses during 2012, this report addresses the following research questions:

• What are the instructional elements that Commonwealth Campus students and teachers view as important for quality teaching?
• How frequently are these elements realized in the teaching that actually occurs?
• How favorably do Commonwealth Campus students rate the overall quality of the instruction they receive?
• What factors relate to differences in how students' perceive instructional quality?
• Do the perceptions of undergraduate students at the Commonwealth Campuses concerning the quality of instruction differ from those at University Park?
• How, if at all, have the perceptions concerning instructional quality changed across time?

Drawing upon new data obtained from surveys of students and instructors at the University Park Campus of Penn State carried out in 2011, this report addresses the following research questions:

• What are the elements that students and instructors believe are most important to achieving quality teaching?
• How frequently do these occur in University Park classrooms today?
• How do University Park students rate the quality of the instruction they receive?
• What factors influence students’ ratings of teaching quality in a course?
• How have the perceptions of students and instructors changed since the 1996 survey?

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