Tools and Resources

List Tools by Title

Browse through the tools by the title of the resource.

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789

Cases that can be used for managing difficult students workshops.

One-page handout to evaluate the quality or effectiveness of case studies.

Case study about a TA who alienates his supervising faculty member. Includes reflection questions about ways to avoid this kind of situation.

Brief discussion of characteristics that case-writers should aim for in order to promote students' learning. Traits discussed include realism, alignment with students' needs, complexity, adequate background information, and clear writing.

Case study: An instructor who has assigned a small-group project finds that one group is functioning poorly. One of the members complains that his religious beliefs make it difficult for him to work with another member of the group, who is gay.

This case study would be appropriate for use with faculty or graduate student instructors. It deals, in particular, with issues of inclusivity and students' inability to pay for required texts.

This is a case study appropriate for use with any faculty or graduate instructor audience. It touches on themes including religious differences, inclusivity, difficult dialogues, and class discussions.

In-depth discussion of planning and writing a case study. Key steps discussed include identifying the reason for using a case study; drafting the case; and piloting and revising it.

Concise and useful guide for instructors designing writing assignments for their students. Focus is on four areas of planning: 1) purpose of the assignment, 2) audience the students will be writing for, 3) strategic/logistical issues, and 4) evaluating the students' work.

This is a faculty peer evaluation form (peer observation, classroom observation). It has a "checklist" format, it does not have a scaled rating (Likert scale) format. This form asks faculty peer reviewers to note the presence of teaching activities/behaviors that have already been established as indicative of high quality teaching. This form is intentionally designed to be shortened by the faculty in an academic unit so that it reflects the unit's teaching values and the priorities of the unit. It should not be used "as is" because it is too much to expect to reviewers to evaluate; fewer items per section list will make the form easier for faculty to use.

The form was created based in January 2006 based on information in: Chism, N.V.N. (1999) Chapter 6: Classroom Observation, Peer Review of Teaching: A Sourcebook. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.

Information about the Technology Classrooms and Student Computing Labs on the University Park Campus and related services.

This document is a 1993 teaching newsletter from Stanford University that addresses the topic of classroom assessments - brief, typically non-graded assignments, that reveals to both teachers and students the extent to which students have the knowledge the teacher expects them to have.

This document provides methods for doing classroom assessment (usually ungraded) to help faculty keep students in large classes engaged and to provide feedback about student knowledge of specific concepts to both faculty and students.

This 2 page handout describes tips for preventing and dealing with classroom incivility and other disruptive behavior.

Case study for classroom management

Lam, R. (2010) A Peer Review Training Workshop: Coaching Students to Give and Evaluate Peer Feedback, TESL Canada Journal/Revue TESL du Canada Vol. 27(2, Spring 2010), 114-127.

Richard Felder and Rebecca Brent describe their approach to Collaborative Learning Strategies.

This document, excerpted from the Penn State Teacher II, includes strategies for planning, implementing, and grading collaborative projects (aka team work or group work). It includes a discussion of group conflicts.

IST's 2010 master assessment plan is a great model for similar programs trying to map their objectives, courses, and assessments.

This book defines assessment, and explains how both teachers and students do it to assess student learning and teaching effectiveness. The book describes assessment practices and best practices for assessment in the college classroom.

Concept inventories or tests are designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts. This link goes to a University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group. It provides information about how to access a variety of concept inventories including mathematical modeling, understanding graphs, vector evaluation, Force Concept Inventory, Mechanics Baseline Test, and several other physics concepts.

Concept inventories are designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts. This webpage provides a list of concept inventories in existence along with their authors. Some can be linked to via the webpage and others cannot. Topics include engineering, science and math.

This document describes how concept maps can be used as active methods for students to learn course material.

This document describes several active learning methods for helping students learn how course concepts are organized.

Using Mental Health and Wellness as a Framework for Course Design
Patricia Dyjur, Gabrielle Lindstrom, Nahum Arguera, Haboun Bair
Proceedings of the University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, Vol. 2, 2017

Abstract
Mental health and wellness is a concern, not only for students, but for instructors in higher education as well. Course design can have a positive or negative impact on both student and instructor wellness, especially around stress and anxiety with assessments, workload, and due dates. Factors of course design such as policies and values, academic expectations, learning environment and learning experiences, student assessment, and reflection and resilience can play an important role in supporting wellness. In this paper we provide examples of how each factor can affect wellness, and offer questions that an instructor can consider when designing a course with wellness in mind.

Official University resource for obtaining copyright approvals for course packets and other publications.

This is a pdf diagram that can help instructors determine whether intellectual property can be legally used in courses under the Fair Use Doctrine. It was developed by Becky Albitz a former Penn State Librarian. Becky is currently the Associate Librarian for Collection Management at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine.

Overview of copyright law as it pertains to higher education. By Becky Albitz.

Presentation from a 2011 workshop by Becky Albitz on legal use of copyrighted materials in the classroom.

Worrisome Student Behaviors: Minimizing Risk

Based on backward design principles, this Course Assessment Plan helps you to align course learning objectives with the formative and summative assessment tools and with the instructional activities that enable students to demonstrate their learning. The document is particularly useful in preparing for course design, course revision, and assessment planning, as well as for curricular and/or accreditation review.

Based on backward design principles, this Course Assessment Plan helps you to align course learning objectives with the formative and summative assessment tools and with the instructional activities that enable students to demonstrate their learning. The document is particularly useful in preparing for course design, course revision, and assessment planning, as well as for curricular and/or accreditation review.

This file contains a list of six course design models chosen as "favorites" by the POD Network members, pulled from a thread on the POD Network Open Discussion Group. The six models are: Purdue’s Interactive Course Re/Design (ICD) Wheel; Connection-Engagement-Empowerment (CEE); Community of Inquiry (CoI) Framework; Kolb’s Experiential Learning Cycle; Fink’s Integrated Course Design; and Backward Design. Moji Shahvali

For use in course design or revision, this Course Outline assists you aligning course topics with course learning objectives, finding and filling gaps in that alignment, and planning how much class time is necessary for students to achieve the learning objectives. The outline is particularly useful in developing shared learning goals for multiple course sections, integrated courses, and linked courses, as well as for submissions for curricular review and assessment planning.

For use in course design or revision, this Course Outline assists you aligning course topics with course learning objectives, finding and filling gaps in that alignment, and planning how much class time is necessary for students to achieve the learning objectives. The outline is particularly useful in developing shared learning goals for multiple course sections, integrated courses, and linked courses, as well as for submissions for curricular review and assessment planning.

Creating a Culture of Academic Integrity publication by Herteis. This document includes a definition of plagiarism, facts about the extent of cheating, why students cheat, and strategies for designing written assignments that reduce plagiarism (among other topics)

This webpage includes suggestions that will help faculty to create a safe classroom environments in which all students, regardless of identity, will feel welcomed. The page includes suggestions for how to create inclusive classrooms from diverse classrooms.

This book is a collection of studies from a variety of institutions with undergraduate research programs. The book focuses on key successful elements of each program, and draws conclusions on the impact of these programs on students. Useful for educators and administrators interested in creating and evaluating undergraduate research programs.

This document describes the process for creating permanent groups (teams) for collaborative learning.

This document describes the process of question sampling (item banking).

This document is an example of a curriculum matrix, used for learning outcomes assessment (aka program assessment), in which general education program objectives are matched with the courses that address them.

Example of a curriculum matrix or map that is for a business program at Penn State Berks. Development of curriculum maps are important parts of the learning outcomes assessment process.

This is curriculum matrix was completed by the faculty in the Elementary and Kindergarten Education program at Penn State Berks. It is used to determine which program goals/objectives are addressed in the various courses included in the program. A curriculum map is an important step in the process of learning outcomes assessment (program assessment).