Tools and Resources

Search Results

This book describes current educational theory and research and offers models of teaching and learning that go beyond the typical lecture-laboratory format. Topics include: student motivation, active learning, use of technology in teaching, and teaching diverse students.

List of references and citations for creating inclusive courses and classrooms; and in support of teaching diverse students.

This webpage lists many resources to help faculty work with diverse students, including strategies for working with specific minority groups, such as students with disabilities. The resources are related to diversity and inclusion.

This document suggests a variety of testing models and explains why each is effective. They are alternatives or supplements to the "mid-term and a final" model.

The Liberal Arts Outreach and Online Education office coordinates with Outreach partners to develop and deliver both online and face-to-face semester-based courses for students interested in accessing a Penn State education at a distance.

This website describes the variety of services offered by ITS to help faculty and students effectively use technology in their teaching and learning.

Making the Right Impressions on the First Day of Class
What can be done then to make a positive first impression in the classroom? In a study
(Hayward, 2001) where students were given a survey after the first class meeting, factors
contributing to positive perceptions of teaching effectiveness were identified.
The power of knowing, in the first two seconds, is our ability to make quick judgments. Think back to when you were in school and how long did it take you to size up a professor? Did you know the first day how good a teacher was, or did it take several classes or the entire semester? Research has found that students watching a silent two-second video clip of a teacher they have never met reach very similar conclusions about that teacher’s effectiveness when compared to students who have sat in the teacher’s class for a semester.
Students have been found to quickly size up a professor on these four factors:

What the Best College Teachers Do
Ken Bain, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA (2004)
The publication, What the Best College Teachers Do, is based on a fifteen-year study of nearly one hundred college teachers from various fields and universities. Author Ken Bain tries to “capture the collective scholarship of some of the best teachers in the United States, to record not just what they think, but most of all, to begin to conceptualize their practices.” In this book, you will find insights on how to engage and challenge students

In 2013, Penn State embarked on a revision of its General Education curriculum. This website provides the opportunity for faculty, staff and students to find out what is happening, provide input and get involved in the process.

This is a one-page tip sheet that guides instructors in thinking about how to "decode" their discipline for students and to strategize ways to help students navigate the challenges of learning in the discipline.

This one-page tip sheet provides background and approaches to guide instructors in directing students toward mastery of content.

Information about the Technology Classrooms and Student Computing Labs on the University Park Campus and related services.

Worrisome Student Behaviors: Minimizing Risk

An introduction to college-level learning, focusing on areas in which first-year students often need to build skills.

Information Technology Services site for students.

Services for Penn State students with disabilities, includes link to faculty handbook and FAQs about working with students with disabilities, as well as additional internal and external resources.

Enrich the educational experience of students through information technology.

This is a blog post by Nick Carvone, Director of Teaching and Learning, for the Bedford/St. Martin's imprint of Macmillan Education. As the title suggests, this site shares ideas for how to teach your students to write more constructive comments on those portions of their teaching evaluations.

Report of results from a 2012 survey of student and faculty perceptions of the quality of instruction at Penn State’s Commonwealth Campuses. This study focuses on what Commonwealth Campus students and faculty believe are the most important elements of quality instruction, their frequency at the campuses, students' ratings of their instruction, factors that differentiate how students perceive quality, comparison of results from Commonwealth Campuses and University Park, and whether perceptions have changed over time.

Report of results from a 2011 survey of student and faculty perceptions of the quality of instruction at Penn State’s University Park campus. This study focuses on what students and faculty believe are the most important elements of quality instruction, their frequency at University Park, students' ratings of their instruction, factors that influence students' ratings, and changes in perceptions compared to 1996 survey results.

Report of results from a 2012 survey of student and faculty perceptions of the quality of instruction of courses offered through Penn State’s World Campus. This study focuses on what students and faculty believe are the most important elements of quality instruction, their frequency in World Campus courses, students' ratings of their instruction, factors that influence students' ratings, and comparison of results from World Campus, the Commonwealth Campuses, and University Park.

This book describes a research-based approach to teaching science to help students gain conceptual understanding. Originally based on biology courses, the book describes an approach rooted in active learning, backward design, and assessment.

This book describes practical strategies for teaching science and engineering courses using writing and collaborative learning. Emphasis is on how to help students build problem-solving skills and conceptual understanding.

This book describes activities college faculty can use to help their students understand the nature of science and engineering, to understand science and engineering concepts, and to solve problems. The book emphasizes how to help students examine and alter their conceptual frameworks.

This book is a collection of studies from a variety of institutions with undergraduate research programs. The book focuses on key successful elements of each program, and draws conclusions on the impact of these programs on students. Useful for educators and administrators interested in creating and evaluating undergraduate research programs.

This book defines assessment, and explains how both teachers and students do it to assess student learning and teaching effectiveness. The book describes assessment practices and best practices for assessment in the college classroom.

This book is a collection of ten articles from college science professors who use investigative learning (also known as inquiry-based instruction) to help students understand how science works. The articles explain how students--including non-majors--can learn to do real-world science.

Faculty sometimes find it difficult to respond to the written comments that accompany SRTEs (aka SETs). This document provides a template for sorting students' comments into themes. The themes provided are common ones, but your ratings may include other themes. If a student's comment includes many themes, we recommend splitting out the comments about different topics. After all of the students comments are sorted, sort the themes from those with the most comments to those with the fewest comments. This can help faculty recognize that not all students agree with the student who wrote one or two particularly hurtful comments. Typically, there is a natural break at around the 3rd or 4th theme and we recommend focusing on the themes most frequently mentioned by students.

This document provides guidelines for presenting your student ratings (aka SRTEs, SETs) for review by a department or program head or a review committee. It provides recommended sections to include in a 1 page summary of your ratings for a particular offering of a course. It can be accompanied by a thematic analysis of students' written feedback (See "Template for Analysis of Student Comments"). Some faculty find that this helps them to clarify what happened in the course and guides them to focus on particular aspects of the course to retain and to improve.

An online tutorial designed to help program faculty learn how to assess programs so that student learning can be improved.

An online module designed to help you work more efficiently with student teams within your classes. This module is designed to help you work with teams in both face-to-face and online courses. Regardless of what type of course you teach, you should find helpful information within this course regarding the formation, facilitation and performance of student teams.

This document describes the difference between goals and objectives and provides lists of explicit verbs that help to write clear, action- and behavior-oriented objectives that will help you write objectives for students or faculty (depending on the focus of your proposed) that will demonstrate project success.

Penn State faculty who have high response rates share advice and strategies that encourage students to complete their the SRTEs.

Designing Effective Reviews: Helping Students Give Helpful Feedback

LET'S GO Scroll Down
This module explores the qualities of effective reviews. Good review prompts help reviewers provide feedback that writers can use to make high-quality revisions.

The module identifies some of the choices that instructors can make while designing review tasks in order to generate helpful feedback. It will discuss the qualities of effective review prompts, design choices, and frameworks for helping structure open-ended feedback.

Lam, R. (2010) A Peer Review Training Workshop: Coaching Students to Give and Evaluate Peer Feedback, TESL Canada Journal/Revue TESL du Canada Vol. 27(2, Spring 2010), 114-127.

Link to article written about a Quality of Instruction (QOI) survey at Penn State supported by grants from the Schreyer Institute.
Fern Willits & Mark Brennan (2017) Another look at college student’s ratings of course quality: data from Penn State student surveys in three settings, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 42:3, 443-462, DOI: 10.1080/02602938.2015.1120858

FERN WILLITS AND MARK BRENNAN (2015) The University as a Community of Learning
Perceptions of Students and Teachers in Three Settings, The Journal of the World Universities Forum
Part of the Quality of Instruction (QOI) series supported by a Schreyer Institute grant

This report focuses on using student ratings data in the faculty evaluation process and is based on Senator Linse’s original work (Linse, in press), with additions specific to Penn State and the SRTEs.

These PowerPoint slides accompanied a presentation by Linda Suskie delivered via Zoom on Tuesday, Apr. 25, 2017. Multiple-choice tests can have a place in many courses. If they’re well designed, they can yield useful information on student achievement of many important course objectives, including some thinking skills. An item analysis of the results can shed light on how well the questions are working as well as what students have learned. Viewers will be able to use principles of good question construction to develop tests, develop test questions that assess thinking skills as well as conceptual understanding, and use item analysis to understand and improve both test questions and student learning. Be sure to open the handouts file listed below as you view the presentation!

These handouts (minus quizzes for test security) accompanied a presentation by Linda Suskie delivered via Zoom on Tuesday, Apr. 25, 2017. Multiple-choice tests can have a place in many courses. If they’re well designed, they can yield useful information on student achievement of many important course objectives, including some thinking skills. An item analysis of the results can shed light on how well the questions are working as well as what students have learned. Viewers will be able to use principles of good question construction to develop tests, develop test questions that assess thinking skills as well as conceptual understanding, and use item analysis to understand and improve both test questions and student learning.

The Dynamics Concept Inventory is a multiple-choice exam with 29 questions. It covers 11 concept areas in rigid body dynamics and several more in particle dynamics. This is one of many concept tests designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts.

Concept inventories or tests are designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts. This link goes to a University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group. It provides information about how to access a variety of concept inventories including mathematical modeling, understanding graphs, vector evaluation, Force Concept Inventory, Mechanics Baseline Test, and several other physics concepts.

This is one of many concept tests designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts. This particular concept test is designed for students who have learned about linear signals and systems.

Concept inventories are designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts. This is an article that describes a concept inventory that assesses statistics knowledge. This link does not take you to the concept inventory itself, but provides information about how to access the inventory.

Concept inventories are designed to assess student's knowledge of particular scientific concepts. This webpage provides a list of concept inventories in existence along with their authors. Some can be linked to via the webpage and others cannot. Topics include engineering, science and math.

The iStudy tutorials are designed to advance students' knowledge and skills in areas that can promote overall academic achievement, such as studying, communicating, and career planning. Faculty can use the tutorials to help students adjust to college curricula and expectations or add career planning tools to syllabi.

Citations about mentoring, primarily academic mentoring. Includes references for mentoring faculty, mentoring graduate students, mentoring minority academic, mentoring for diversity & inclusion.

The Lecture/Discussion Facilitation Template was distributed at the 2017 Lilly Evidence-based Teaching & Learning Conference held in Bethesda, MD June 1 - 4, 2017. Use it during lectures as a low-stakes, largely anonymous method to gauge students’ understanding, as a pop quiz or survey, or to keep track of in-class group activities. The template can improve student participation and engagement by minimizing their fears of low (or even “too high”) performance before their classmates, and it provides a demonstrable, observable, measurable, and active way to gain a sense of how well students are “getting it,” beyond the glint in their eyes. In that sense, it serves as a quick formative assessment tool that can be customized on demand.

Concise and useful guide for instructors designing writing assignments for their students. Focus is on four areas of planning: 1) purpose of the assignment, 2) audience the students will be writing for, 3) strategic/logistical issues, and 4) evaluating the students' work.

This page was produced by the University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences. The most useful part is the subsection about "approaches to enhance specific writing abilities." That subsection includes information / activities that instructors can use to help students read and write scientific papers (e.g., breaking an abstract into its component parts, synthesizing information from different sources).

"The Graduate Writing Center (GWC) provides free one-on-one professional consulting and interactive workshops for Penn State graduate students of all disciplines and all levels of writing ability. The GWC is sponsored by the Pennsylvania State University Graduate School, the Department of English, and World Campus." Page includes detailed information and scheduling options.

This website provides extensive advice on responding effectively to students' writing. The advice is structured into phases related to 1) pre-assignment planning and communication with students, 2) grading and commenting, and 3) post-assignment strategies for helping students improve their writing. Includes hyperlinks to numerous additional resources.

This webpage includes suggestions that will help faculty to create a safe classroom environments in which all students, regardless of identity, will feel welcomed. The page includes suggestions for how to create inclusive classrooms from diverse classrooms.

This webpage includes a list of resources to help faculty work with diverse student populations. It provides resources that are specific for various minority groups, such as women or students of color. The resources are related to diversity and inclusion.

The SALG website is a free course-evaluation tool that allows college-level instructors to gather learning-focused feedback from students. It can be used for mid-semester feedback that will help instructors improve student learning in the course.

This is a peer-reviewed article published in the journal of Studies in Educational Evaluation. Its focus is the accurate interpretation of student ratings data (including Penn State's SRTE) and appropriate use of the data to evaluate faculty. It includes recommendations for use and interpretation based on more than 80 years of student ratings research. Most colleges and universities use student ratings data to guide personnel decisions so it is critical that administrators and faculty evaluators have access to the cumulative knowledge about student ratings based on multiple studies, rather than single studies that have not been replicated, studies based on non-representative populations, or that are from a single discipline.

The article provides an overview of common views and misconceptions about student ratings, followed by clarification of what student ratings are and are not. It also includes two sets of guidelines for administrators and faculty serving on review committees.

For use in course design or revision, this Course Outline assists you aligning course topics with course learning objectives, finding and filling gaps in that alignment, and planning how much class time is necessary for students to achieve the learning objectives. The outline is particularly useful in developing shared learning goals for multiple course sections, integrated courses, and linked courses, as well as for submissions for curricular review and assessment planning.

For use in course design or revision, this Course Outline assists you aligning course topics with course learning objectives, finding and filling gaps in that alignment, and planning how much class time is necessary for students to achieve the learning objectives. The outline is particularly useful in developing shared learning goals for multiple course sections, integrated courses, and linked courses, as well as for submissions for curricular review and assessment planning.

This guide for students was created by Dr. Stephanie Ludi when she was at Rochester Institute of Technology (copyright 1994, 1998, 2006). Dr. Ludi is now professor at Univ. of North Texas, but her guide is still incredibly useful. The TOC for the guide includes:
General Group Tasks (Administrative Duties That Lay the Project and Group Foundation; Successful Group Dynamics; Project Management; What You Need to Know About Risk)
Group Members As Individuals And Their Evolving, Working Relationships (Interpersonal Communication; Potential Profiles of A Group Member; Handling Conflict)
Special Issues [that students] May Face During The Project (Time Management and Priorities That Are Unique To Students; The Group Grade; Other Useful Stuff)
Student Project Myths

Based on backward design principles, this Course Assessment Plan helps you to align course learning objectives with the formative and summative assessment tools and with the instructional activities that enable students to demonstrate their learning. The document is particularly useful in preparing for course design, course revision, and assessment planning, as well as for curricular and/or accreditation review.

Based on backward design principles, this Course Assessment Plan helps you to align course learning objectives with the formative and summative assessment tools and with the instructional activities that enable students to demonstrate their learning. The document is particularly useful in preparing for course design, course revision, and assessment planning, as well as for curricular and/or accreditation review.

This document guides faculty interested in course- or classroom-based research on student learning in the design process. Following the guidelines will help ensure that the research projects will be sound and robust and resulting insights can inform and extend our understanding of the processes of learning and of supporting that learning with effective, evidence-based instruction. While created to meet requirements for Canadian standards, the resource is also useful for researchers in the U.S.
The guide takes researchers through the essentials of the Canadian standards for ethical practice in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) which are unique because of participants (human subjects) are also typically the researcher’s students. This Guide translates the Canadian TCPS2 (2014) for the researcher conducting SoTL research.

This resource is written by Lisa Fedoruk at the University of Calgary, with contributions by 18 scholars across Canada. It is grounded in the Canadian document governing research ethics, but the specific strategies listed throughout will be useful and helpful for researchers in other countries. Provided by Nancy Chick, Academic Director of the Taylor Institute for Teaching & Learning, University Chair in Teaching and Learning, University of Calgary.

Heavily abridged version of Weinstein, Y., Madan, C. R., & Smith, M. A. (in press). Teaching the science of learning. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, prepared for and presented at "Reframing Testing as a Learning Experience: Three Strategies for Use in the Classroom and at Home" on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017.

Six key learning strategies from research in cognitive psychology can be applied to education: spaced practice, interleaving, elaborative interrogation, concrete examples, dual coding, and retrieval practice. However, a recent report (Pomerance, Greenberg, & Walsh, 2016) found that few teacher-training textbooks cover these principles; current study-skills courses also lack coverage of these important learning strategies. Students are therefore missing out on mastering techniques they could use on their own to learn effectively. This handout contains the six key learning strategies to address those concerns.

Writing learning goals and explicit learning objectives will make it easier for students to understand what is expected of them in your course. Goals communicate what students will learn and objectives communicate the kind and quality of work you expect of them. Explicit objectives also make it easier for faculty to make decisions about course content, activities, assignments, and grading.

Let’s Talk About Power: How Teacher Use of Power Shapes Relationships and Learning
Leslie Frances Reid, Jalal Kawash
Proceedings of the University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, Vol 2, 2017
Abstract
Teachers’ use of power in learning environments affects our students’ experiences, our teaching experiences, and the extent to which learning goals are met. The types of conversations we hold or avoid with students send cues regarding how we use power to develop relationships, influence behaviour and entice motivation. Reliance on prosocial forms of power, such as referent, reward, and expert, have a positive impact on outcomes such as learning and motivation, as well as perceived teacher credibility. Overuse of antisocial forms of power that include legitimate and coercive powers negatively affect these same outcomes. In this paper, we share stories from our teaching experiences that highlight how focusing on referent, reward and expert power bases to connect, problem solve, and negotiate challenges with our students has significantly enhanced our teaching practice. We provide resources that can be used by teachers to become aware of and utilize prosocial power strategies in their practice through self-reflection and peer and student feedback.

The Role of Interactive Digital Simulations in Student Conversations About Visualizing Molecules
Yuen-ying Carpenter, Erin Rae Sullivan
Proceedings of the University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, Vol. 2, 2017

Abstract
The visualization of chemical compounds in three-dimensions is a foundational skill in the study and practice of chemistry and related fields, and one which has the potential to be supported by interaction with virtual models. Here, we present a collaborative learning activity piloted in first-year chemistry which investigates if inquiry-driven interactive technology can contribute meaningfully to student conversations around this topic, and how students’ conversations and practices may shift when driven by feedback from an interactive simulation. Our initial observations from this pilot project suggest that students engaged in collaborative sense-making and discussion around key ideas throughout this activity. Students’ post-activity reflections also highlighted their positive experiences and increased confidence with the topic afterwards. The unique dynamics of these interactions lead us to propose a novel framing of interactive visualizations as participants rather than merely as resources in student learning conversations.

Using Mental Health and Wellness as a Framework for Course Design
Patricia Dyjur, Gabrielle Lindstrom, Nahum Arguera, Haboun Bair
Proceedings of the University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, Vol. 2, 2017

Abstract
Mental health and wellness is a concern, not only for students, but for instructors in higher education as well. Course design can have a positive or negative impact on both student and instructor wellness, especially around stress and anxiety with assessments, workload, and due dates. Factors of course design such as policies and values, academic expectations, learning environment and learning experiences, student assessment, and reflection and resilience can play an important role in supporting wellness. In this paper we provide examples of how each factor can affect wellness, and offer questions that an instructor can consider when designing a course with wellness in mind.

Faculty and student resources useful for new faculty and their students. Faculty resources include links to Schreyer Institute, new instructor orientation, Canvas LMS, LionPATH (student information system), faculty handbook, testing, teaching and learning with technology, student ratings (student evaluations, course evaluations),

Administrators and faculty review committees are responsible for providing feedback to the faculty they evaluate. Both groups can experience discomfort about making life-altering decisions that affect other faculty based on student ratings data (though hopefully not solely on those data). The discomfort and fear of SRTEs is exacerbated when faculty make incorrect assumptions about the history of the SRTEs or if they rely on opinion pieces or stories about studies that have not undergone peer-review rather than the significant body of research conducted by student ratings experts.

Administrators have the additional responsibility of providing useful and actionable feedback to guide faculty development, as well as responding in productive ways to faculty complaints or defensiveness. Below are some of the most common questions asked by administrators during or after a feedback meeting with a faculty member.

Instructional Foundations is a series of workshops for graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and instructors
from all disciplines who have never taught at the university level (grading experience OK) prior to Fall 2016. The
series is designed to provide people new to college teaching with knowledge, skills and confidence they can use in
their first teaching experience.

Penn State Teacher II 1997. Compendium of teaching tips and advice from seasoned faculty and graduate students. Includes sections on Course design, matching teaching methods with learning objectives, teaching large courses, evaluating student learning, collecting feedback, sample syllabi, feedback questionaires, grading standards, plagiarism, teaching philosophies.
Authored by D. Enerson, R. Neill Johnson, Susannah Milner, and Kathryn M. Plank.

This document was created to provide you with a source of options for gathering data on teamwork assignments and projects. You may choose to adopt one of the examples as is, combine elements from several of the examples, or use the examples to identify characteristics that correspond to particular aspects of your assigned work, course content, or student population.

This is a case study written to help faculty members think about and discuss issues related to students making inappropriate comments in class.

This diversity case study was designed to help faculty think about and discuss how best to address a classroom that includes students from diverse backgrounds. This document is most useful for faculty developers.

This document provides an example of a test blueprint, which can be used to help guide test development and ensure that the test questions appropriately reflect the learning objectives of the unit that the test is designed to assess. It can also help students when they study for the test.

Reference list for TAs: links to resources for undergraduates, including Counseling and Psychological Services and the Women's Resource Center

Best practices for teaching assistants as they interact with students. Includes tips on creating rapport and establishing effective boundaries.

Case study for classroom management

One-page handout of information about the Schreyer Institute and Student Ratings of Teaching Effectiveness (SRTE)

One page handout summarizing research literature on the correlation between student ratings and grades.

This is an example of a rubric that can be used to grade writing assignments. It can be adapted to specific writing assignments. The use of a rubric helps to make grading more accurate and consistent and helps students to create higher quality assignments.

This file contains a list of "item-writing rules," which will help you to write multiple choice questions in a way that will improve the ability of the test to focus on the content and prevent students from guessing the correct answer without knowing the material. The rules were developed by experts in the field of psychometrics, like the people who write questions for SATs or GREs.

This brief document addresses academic integrity by outlining which students cheat, why they cheat, how they cheat and how instructors can reduce cheating and plagiarism.

This document describes strategies students use to cheat and strategies faculty can use to minimize cheating.

This document outlines the research evidence for the impact of large classes on student learning.

This PowerPoint about reading compliance was presented by Amit Sharma. It describes his research into factors that prevent students from doing course readings and strategies that instructors could use to improve reading compliance.

This document provides methods for doing classroom assessment (usually ungraded) to help faculty keep students in large classes engaged and to provide feedback about student knowledge of specific concepts to both faculty and students.

This document describes strategies for encouraging and enabling students in large classes to participate in class.

This is a worksheet that includes the reasons why students might be misbehaving in large classes and strategies for addressing the incivility.

This PowerPoint presents a research project by Peter M. Eberle and Anthony J. Hoos in that includes data collected by asking students about their perceptions of using digital textbooks, such as iPads and e-readers, for their course reading.

This PowerPoint presents data collected by Russell Casey and Janet Ann Melnick in 2011. It summarizes their research project on student perspectives on advising and provides suggestions for instructors who advise students.

This handout highlights some of the current research based strategies for teaching millennial students.

This PowerPoint, by Mary Ann Knapp, focuses on how faculty can help students who may be experiencing psychological distress.

This survey is used at Penn State Berks to assess student teachers. It includes questions that are completed by the administrator who supervises the student teacher. It is used for program assessment purposes.

This survey is used by the Penn State Berks teacher education program to assess student teachers for learning outcomes assessment (program assessment) purposes.

This essay, written by Penn State's Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, John Lowe, describes several useful strategies for collecting course-level assessment about students' study habits and learning, which can be used to improve student learning.

This document briefly describes what service-learning is and the ways in which it can promote student learning.

One-page example of how to annotate student ratings for a course.

Guidelines for faculty to annotate their SRTEs.

This excerpt from "Student Learning Assessment: Options and Resources" provides three sample rubric types including simple, detailed and holistic. These rubrics can help to improve the grading process. The publication was written by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

2011 report on survey of student views on the quality of instruction at Penn State.

2011 report on survey of student views on the quality of instruction at Penn State

This report is the first in a series encompassed by the Quality of Instruction project. The research question guiding this report is: How do students and teachers view the instructional process at University Park? Information to address this question was obtained by surveying both students and faculty concerning their attitudes and experiences at University Park during the 1995-1996 academic year. These student and teacher surveys were made possible by support from the Penn State Alumni Association provided Fern (Bunny) Willits as the 1995-96 Alumni Teaching Fellow awardee and the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology. Class Attendance data were provided by the Office of Student Affairs Research and Assessment Pulse Survey.
The complete citation for the report is:
Willits, Fern K., Moore, Betty L., & Enerson, Diane M. (1997). Penn State, Quality of Instruction: Surveys of Students and Teachers at University Park. Pennsylvania State University.

The third in a series of reports dealing with the views of students and faculty about undergraduate
education at Penn State.

An eight question survey for students to assess how they prepared for a class and how they rate the difficulty of the exam.

An agenda and outline of a workshop topics on an academic resume, a teaching philosophy and an electronic teaching portfolio. This workshop is intended for graduate students who are teaching.

List the program outcomes that are addressed in a course and identify the specific student work in the course that can be used to document evidence of achievement for each relevant outcome.

Creating a Culture of Academic Integrity publication by Herteis. This document includes a definition of plagiarism, facts about the extent of cheating, why students cheat, and strategies for designing written assignments that reduce plagiarism (among other topics)

Brief discussion of characteristics that case-writers should aim for in order to promote students' learning. Traits discussed include realism, alignment with students' needs, complexity, adequate background information, and clear writing.

Brief (2-page) handout about strategies to promote effective student discussion.

Guidelines published by the Office of Student Conduct.

This file is a brief overview of how to develop a rubric, which can be useful for grading essays or other student projects. Rubrics make grading easier and more consistent as well as provide information to students that helps them do well on the assignment.

This document is a 1993 teaching newsletter from Stanford University that addresses the topic of classroom assessments - brief, typically non-graded assignments, that reveals to both teachers and students the extent to which students have the knowledge the teacher expects them to have.

This case study involves a female professor and her response to a female student who has been teased by males (who are the majority of the class). This document is most useful for faculty developers.

This case involves an elderly returning adult student who behaves in a way that makes the faculty member uncomfortable. This document is most useful for faculty developers.

This document provides a brief description of course goals and course objectives or course outcomes for student learning. Learning outcomes (or learning objectives) are useful to develop during course design, as well as when creating an assignment or activity.

There are 4 tips to help bolster grading efficiency and to deal with student grade complaints.

Common questions that applicants for faculty positions can expect to encounter.

This is a ready-to-use template for collecting mid-semester or end-of-course open-ended feedback from students.

Case study: A teaching assistant discovers that many of the class activities she planned will be physically impossible for one of her students.

This FAQ sheet offers many ideas and strategies for engaging students in active learning, given a large class environment.

This FAQ sheet offers many strategies for collecting student feedback in large classes.

This FAQ sheet discusses issues and strategies related to providing notes and supporting students' notetaking in large classes.

This FAQ sheet provides many suggestions for encouraging student participation in large classes.

This case study would be appropriate for use with faculty or graduate student instructors. It deals, in particular, with issues of inclusivity and students' inability to pay for required texts.

Cases that can be used for managing difficult students workshops.

This is a true and false quiz to test assumptions about student ratings.

Three learning outcomes from Penn State Mont Alto along with suggestions on next steps are briefly described in this paper.

This case study is about how an instructor is presented a unique request from a transgender student. Several discussion questions are included.

This document is an example of a test blueprint (written for a research methods course), which can be created to help you match your test questions with your learning objectives *and* to help your students study for a test.

This PowerPoint, giving by Bill Welsh, provides suggestions for how faculty can accommodate students with disabilities in their classrooms.

Handout from Cindy Raynak's 2012 Teaching Professor presentation in Washington, DC. Describes the concept of "student-centered discussion," it's advantages for student learning, and how the process works.

PowerPoint presentation, authored by Cindy Raynak, that describes "student centered discussion."

This worksheet was developed for faculty involved in program assessment. The document will help program faculty link program learning objectives with appropriate assignments that can be used as evidence that students have achieved those objectives.

This document provides examples of measures that are classified as direct or indirect evidence. It provides a list of appropriate direct or indirect measures of student learning which can be used in the process of program assessment.

This is a sample view of the Student Evaluation of Educational Quality (SEEQ) questionnaire. SEEQ is a 9-factor omnibus student rating form that has been heavily researched by nearly one million surveyed respondents as being appropriate for determining teaching effectiveness over diverse settings. Instructors commonly use this tool for collecting mid-semester feedback from their students. Additional information is available on our web site at http://www.schreyerinstitute.psu.edu/MidsemesterFeedback.

This document describes how to use case studies as strategies to provide active learning experiences for students.

This document describes how concept maps can be used as active methods for students to learn course material.

This document describes an alternative method for assessment in which students work collaboratively on an exam.

This document describes strategies for using group quizzes to assess student knowledge.

This document describes the process of writing problems for use in helping students learn course material through problem-based learning.

This document describes a specific strategy that provides a collaborative learning experience for students.

This document describes several active learning methods for helping students learn how course concepts are organized.

This document describes several strategies that can be used to make concepts "concrete" and provide tactile material that can help students learn.

This document describes the use of student peers to provide feedback on written assignments by fellow students.

Student collaborative writing (peer writing) is a strategy in which students work together on all aspects of a writing project. It can reduce the need for the faculty member to spend time reading and commenting on drafts.

This activity involves students pairing up to answer questions about course content and can be used for review of material before a test, for example, or for practice.

This strategy involves posing relevant open-ended problems for students to discuss.

This document describes how to use role-playing exercises to help students grasp certain concepts.

Round Robin is a systematic technique that allows students to brainstorm answers to questions. It allows all students an opportunity to contribute.

A simulation provides a way for students to experience the content in action and spark discussion.

This strategy involves students working together in groups to research the solution to a problem.

This document describes how to facilitate discussions that are led by students in small groups.

This document describes a strategy for getting students involved with the content by having them pair with other students to discuss the answer to an instructor-posed problem. The pairs then share their answers with the class.

This document describes a strategy to help students get more involved in lectures by periodically posing an question and having them discuss with a neighboring classmate.

This document is an example of a survey that can be given to administrators of student teacher programs to determine the student's performance. This example is from Penn State Berks.

This document is an example of a survey that can be used to determine graduating students' perceptions of the knowledge and skills they have developed during their program. This tool can be used for learning outcomes assessment (aka program assessment).

This document is an example of a survey used to gather assessment data from student teacher mentors about the student teacher's performance. This survey is useful for learning outcomes assessment (program assessment). This example comes from Penn State Berks.

This is an example of a survey that can be given to the principal of a school at which a student teacher has been assigned. The survey provides an assessment of the student's performance from the perspective of the school principal. It is a useful tool for learning outcomes assessment (program assessment).

This PowerPoint slide shows an example of evidence resulting from the learning outcomes assessment process at the course level (accounting in this example). It shows the extent to which students achieved the learning objectives of the course. This information can also be used to assess course learning objectives or course learning outcomes at the program level.

This document provides an example of how an accounting program collected, displayed and used evidence of student learning to make decisions that would lead to improved student learning in the program. This exemplifies an important step in learning outcomes assessment process.

Drawing upon data from surveys of students and instructors at the 19 Commonwealth Campuses during 2012, this report addresses the following research questions:

• What are the instructional elements that Commonwealth Campus students and teachers view as important for quality teaching?
• How frequently are these elements realized in the teaching that actually occurs?
• How favorably do Commonwealth Campus students rate the overall quality of the instruction they receive?
• What factors relate to differences in how students' perceive instructional quality?
• Do the perceptions of undergraduate students at the Commonwealth Campuses concerning the quality of instruction differ from those at University Park?
• How, if at all, have the perceptions concerning instructional quality changed across time?

Drawing upon new data obtained from surveys of students and instructors at the University Park Campus of Penn State carried out in 2011, this report addresses the following research questions:

• What are the elements that students and instructors believe are most important to achieving quality teaching?
• How frequently do these occur in University Park classrooms today?
• How do University Park students rate the quality of the instruction they receive?
• What factors influence students’ ratings of teaching quality in a course?
• How have the perceptions of students and instructors changed since the 1996 survey?